Visual Arts: Shocking dreams and painted dogs - a buyer's guide

YOU NEVER know how your children are going to show you up - especially if they become artists. Whether their work embraces violence, homosexuality or God, the finger is likely to be pointed at mum and dad. Upbringing, you know.

Among young artists' work for sale this week are 25-year-old Alexander Sandover's 10 photographs, each showing a pair of gilt-framed portraits of an archetypal (and presumably heterosexual) paterfamilias and his wife - with a young gay couple in various poses beneath them.

Sandover, who graduated in fine art from the Byam Shaw School of Art, calls them "the normal couple". He says: "My interest lies in the gay politics of living in a time when a homosexual lifestyle is being increasingly tolerated and heterosexual reaction to the urban gay community seems to be mellowing".

The photographs cost pounds 400 to pounds 750 and are exhibited until 23 April in "Ambiguous" at the Thomas Kettle Gallery, 53a Neal Street, Covent Garden, London WC2 (0171-379 3579).

Toby Rye, 29, who has just become a father, says that his acrylic on board "Where Do Dreams Come From?" was inspired by a recent, not a childhood dream.

"But the point of it was that the person with no genitals was my father. It's me who's got the genitals now," he says. The child is father to the man.

"It's a bit personal, and some people are shocked," says Rye, a graduate of the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. "But they feel relieved that someone can visualise the sort of dream they have had."

Ironically, Rye's one-man show of 20 paintings is being exhibited by Well Hung - the gallery that was founded by television presenter Chris Evans - in the restaurant and bar of Hype DF, the clothes shop in Kensington High Street, London W8.

Most of the paintings are brighter and lighter than this one. All cost pounds 450+VAT and the show runs until 2 May (0171-937 6355).

Nico Westerdale, 22, won a Chief Scout's Challenge Award. He was a good boy, but his parents' separation threw him.

He made "I Must Not Draw On The Wall", a repetitive engraving on metal, last September, around the time he used to sit on the stairs, listening to them discussing who would get what.

"I'm sure there was a link," he says: "I was feeling very depressed. At that time, I also made a video of paint drying."

Westerdale is best known for his closely-packed line drawings that build into distortions. The engraving costs pounds 200 and is exhibited in his show at the Original Levi's Store Oxford Gallery, 29 Queen Street, Oxford - another fashionable shop that, like Hype DF and Habitat, which initiated the trend, knows the value of linking its name with bright young artists.

The show is on until 28 April (0171-439 2559).

Giles Humphreys, 32, quit Sunday school at the age of seven. Now, he says, he is spoken to by God and drops all to sculpt to God's command.

His exhibition of 16 artworks, "Christ", includes a copper-wire word- cube of the Lord's prayer, "Our Father". His dad did have something to do with it - he had a printing and graphic-design business and young Humphreys became passionately fond of typography.

Humphreys, who studied design, manufacture and management at Cambridge, says that God speaks to him inaudibly. The first time it happened was when he was in prayer during a Bible Week.

"It was awesome, as I'm sure you can imagine," he says. "Now, I often sculpt by resting in God's presence, then going to clay, wax or wire to replicate what He has shown me. It often takes a number of iterations to get it right."

Prices of artworks in "Christ" cost from pounds 50 to pounds 1,000 and are exhibited at the Ark-T Gallery, Crowell Road, Cowley, Oxford until 25 April (01865 773499).

Justine Smith, a 26-year-old multi-media artist, has been making friends with dogs ever since she was forced to walk to her studio in Clapham, south London, after a road accident.

She photographs them, with their owners' consent, then sculpts them in chicken wire and papier-mache and covers them with her favourite gags from the Beano comic.

Besides Bean - her first comic dog, modelled from a German Weimaraner in a dog book - there's Wizard and Daisy (their real names), Spike the mongrel and Sniff, a breed she invented.

"I love the colours in the Beano," she says. "It makes the dogs look light-hearted and cartoony". She had never heard of those folk-art dogs woven from strips of cigarette packet. Of course not. That sort of thing went out with our grandparents.

Neil Hamon's "Blinkers" is one of six artworks showcased on the website Vote for Art.

The shortlisted works are by BA fine-art students at the Central Saint Martin's College of Art and Design on the theme "Open to Interpretation".

The competition is sponsored by The Research Business International, in conjunction with the college.

Just access the website - www.voteforart.com - and cast your vote by 24 April.

The winner - who will receive pounds 1,500 and possibly another pounds 1,500, to be awarded by a judging panel - will be announced on the site on 1 May.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
ebookNow available in paperback
ebooks
ebookA delicious collection of 50 meaty main courses
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

SPONSORED FEATURES

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs General

    Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive or Senior Sales Executive - B2B Exhibitions

    £18000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Sales Executive or Senior Sal...

    Recruitment Genius: Head of Support Services

    £40000 - £55000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

    Recruitment Genius: Warehouse Team Leader

    £22000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This industry leading company produces h...

    Recruitment Genius: Business Development Manager / Sales - OTE £40,000

    £20000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This IT provider for the educat...

    Day In a Page

    The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

    The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

    Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
    House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

    The honours that shame Britain

    Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
    When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

    'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

    Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
    International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

    International Tap Festival comes to the UK

    Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
    War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

    Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

    Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border
    Doris Lessing: Acclaimed novelist was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show

    'A subversive brothel keeper and Communist'

    Acclaimed novelist Doris Lessing was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show
    Big Blue Live: BBC's Springwatch offshoot swaps back gardens for California's Monterey Bay

    BBC heads to the Californian coast

    The Big Blue Live crew is preparing for the first of three episodes on Sunday night, filming from boats, planes and an aquarium studio
    Austin Bidwell: The Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England with the most daring forgery the world had known

    Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England

    Conman Austin Bidwell. was a heartless cad who carried out the most daring forgery the world had known
    Car hacking scandal: Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked

    Car hacking scandal

    Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked
    10 best placemats

    Take your seat: 10 best placemats

    Protect your table and dine in style with a bold new accessory
    Ashes 2015: Alastair Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

    Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

    Aussie skipper Michael Clarke was lured into believing that what we witnessed at Edgbaston and Trent Bridge would continue in London, says Kevin Garside
    Can Rafael Benitez get the best out of Gareth Bale at Real Madrid?

    Can Benitez get the best out of Bale?

    Back at the club he watched as a boy, the pressure is on Benitez to find a winning blend from Real's multiple talents. As La Liga begins, Pete Jenson asks if it will be enough to stop Barcelona
    Athletics World Championships 2015: Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jessica Ennis-Hill and Katarina Johnson-Thompson heptathlon rivalry

    Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jess and Kat rivalry

    The last time the two British heptathletes competed, Ennis-Hill was on the way to Olympic gold and Johnson-Thompson was just a promising teenager. But a lot has happened in the following three years
    Jeremy Corbyn: Joining a shrewd operator desperate for power as he visits the North East

    Jeremy Corbyn interview: A shrewd operator desperate for power

    His radical anti-austerity agenda has caught the imagination of the left and politically disaffected and set a staid Labour leadership election alight
    Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief: Defender of ancient city's past was killed for protecting its future

    Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief

    Robert Fisk on the defender of the ancient city's past who was killed for protecting its future