A brief history of broken promises: Sarajevo cries out for UN action

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The Independent Online
'We, the heads of state and government of the member countries of the North Atlantic alliance, are deeply concerned by the current crisis in Yugoslavia' - Nato leaders in Rome, December 1991

'While giving priority to peaceful means, the European Council does not exclude support for the use of military means by the UN to achieve these humanitarian objectives' - EU leaders at the Lisbon summit, June 1992

'One thing that will encourage them (the people of Sarajevo) is the decision to send (international) observers to the Bosnian- Croatian border and the Bosnian- Serbian border . . . We can't rely on the goodwill of the parties. We need pressure' - John Major after London conference on Yugoslavia, August 1992

'Given the gravity of this tragic situation, (the EU) has no choice but to promote and participate in further initiatives which the international community may be obliged to undertake' - December 1992, European summit, Edinburgh

'We do not exclude any options in support of new and tougher measures decided by the UN' - Nato foreign ministers meeting in Athens, June 1993

'An attack on the town of Sarajevo should be considered an attack on UN peace-keepers and against the entire world' - French General Philippe Morillon, after a meeting in New York, July 1993

'The Alliance has now decided to make immediate preparations for undertaking, in the event that the strangulation of Sarajevo and other areas continues . . . stronger measures including air strikes against those responsible . . .' - Manfred Worner, Secretary-General of Nato, August 1993

'If we are going to reassert this warning it cannot be seen as mere rhetoric. Those who attack Sarajevo must understand that we are serious' - President Clinton at Nato summit, January 1994

'If there are any initiatives of a military kind that the military are able to recommend as being relevant, then clearly that is something we would have to listen to very carefully' - Malcolm Rifkind, in Sarajevo yesterday

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