The fat cat list 2003, part four

Numbers 76 - 100
Click to follow
The Independent Online

76. ROLF BÖRJESSON, REXAM

£1.55m
Shareholder return 71.4%

Börjesson, the Scandinavian chief executive of the packaging company Rexam, is one of the handful of FTSE bosses who can do no wrong in investors' eyes at the moment. Seen as the Sven-Goran Eriksson of the business world, Börjesson has transformed the firm into the world's biggest maker of drinks cans, and which last year reported profits of £274m.

77. JEFFREY HARRIS, ALLIANCE UNICHEM

£1.39m
Shareholder return 40.3%

Jeffrey Harris, 54, is the executive chairman of Alliance UniChem, and he saw his salary and bonus rise to £670,000 when the company – a supplier to and owner of chemists nationwide and on mainland Europe – raised board pay by 20 per cent. (The former Chancellor Kenneth Clarke is the chairman of UniChem's remuneration committee). Jeffrey Harris has also accrued a very nice £5.65m pension pot for himself.

78. STEPHEN RUSSELL, BOOTS

£1.38m
Shareholder return 30.3%

Russell has spent 36 years at Boots, but his three-year stint as chief executive was not happy and he leaves at the end of this month. Under him Boots racked up huge losses overseas and in internet ventures but his biggest disaster was the foray into "Wellbeing" services such as Botox treatments and aromatherapy. Russell, 58, goes with a quarter-of-a-million pound pay-off. He is being replaced by Richard Baker, a 40-year-old executive from Asda.

79. DAVID WEBSTER, SAFEWAY

£1.26m
Shareholder return 23.1%

This is likely to be Safeway's last year as an independent company as five groups battle to take it over. Britain's fourth-largest supermarket operator is run by David Webster, the last surviving member of the triumvirate of businessmen who took over Safeway. Webster's recent masterstroke was to hire the flamboyant Carlo Criado-Perez as chief executive; the Argentine has led a revival.

80. MARK LOVEDAY, FOREIGN & COLONIAL

£.04m
Shareholder return -28.8%

Mark Loveday became chairman of Foreign & Colonial Investment Trust – the world's oldest and largest investment trust company – in May 2002. The performance of the fund, once seen as a core holding for the everyday private investor, has slipped beneath many of its peers. In the past three years, investors would have lost 29 per cent of their money.

81. CHARLES BANKS, WOLSELEY

£1.6m
Shareholder return 88.5%

Charles Banks, the US-born chief executive of the plumbing and building supply group Wolseley, gave investors a nice surprise in March by announcing decent results a day earlier than expected. It was welcome news after the shares leaked last autumn when the City panicked over its exposure to asbestos-related lawsuits in the US – one of the few blips under Mr Banks' tenure.

82. RICHARD PYM, ALLIANCE & LEICESTER

£1.43m
Shareholder return 62.5%

Richard Pym, 53, joined Alliance & Leicester in September 2001 and began a new era for the former building society. He has slashed and burned the company's product range to bring it back to basics – mortgages, current accounts and loans. The breath of fresh air may come from his range of corporate experience, having worked for British Gas, British American Tobacco and Burton. He is also a non-executive director of Selfridges.

83. MICHAEL HODGKINSON, BAA

£1.19m
Shareholder return 15.8%

Mike Hodgkinson, 58, the retiring chief executive of airports operator BAA, is also a board member of Royal Mail where he will earn £37,500 a year in addition to his pension of £174,000 a year. A grammar-school boy from Hornchurch in Essex, Mr Hodgkinson has been a high-flyer since 1972, when at the age of 28 he found himself deciding the pricing policy of British Leyland's cars, having been poached from Ford.

84. DAVID THOMAS, WHITBREAD

£1.15m
Shareholder return 22.1%

A couple of years ago, David Thomas would have been seen as one of the disasters of the FTSE 100 chief executives, after Whitbread lost out in a crucial battle for Allied Domecq's pubs estate. Since then it has got back on track by concentrating on leisure brands such as Beefeater and Travel Inn. Having dipped out of the FTSE 100 in the dark days, Whitbread bounced back in last year.

85. GRAHAM MACKAY, SABMILLER

£1.06m
Shareholder return 11.8%

Graham Mackay was appointed chief executive of South African Breweries in 1999. Last year, the brewing specialist changed its name with the acquisition of the US-based Miller Brewing Company and was renamed SABMiller. But the integration of the two firms has not been plain sailing. Last autumn, SABMiller admitted the Miller business had not performed as well as hoped.

86. JIM FORBES SCOTTISH & SOUTHERN ENERGY

£1.34m
Shareholder return 46.6%

The acerbic chief executive of Scottish & Southern Energy, Jim Forbes, hung up his boots last year to the surprise of everyone in the business in order for him to spend more time watching his beloved Rangers football team. In his last full year in the job he earned £786,000 – an 11 per cent rise on the previous 12 months.

87. PETER JACKSON, ASSOCIATED BRITISH FOODS

£1.29m
Shareholder return 50.5%

Peter Jackson made history in 1999 by becoming the first outsider to take the helm at the food giant Associated British Foods, the food and retail giant controlled by the Weston family. Jackson, 56, runs a tight ship at ABF, which owns Kingsmill bread, Twinings tea and the Primark discount clothing chain. He is on the prowl for acquisitions, and has £836m to play with despite spending £500m buying brands such as Ovaltine.

88. ANTHONY HABGOOD, BUNZL

£1.11m
Shareholder return 46%

Habgood is the executive chairman of Bunzl, the packaging company which sells and distributes everything from paper serviettes, sandwich wrappers, and coffee cup lids to cigarette filters. Under Mr Habgood, Bunzl has continued to perform well by upping its profits, despite a fall in the prices of its products and a weak dollar. The 56-year-old has been at the helm since 1991 and is credited with turning around the group that was once nicknamed as "Bungle".

89. JOHN ROBERTS, UNITED UTILITIES

£.8m
Shareholder return 23.3%

One of the most respected bosses in an industry which virtually invented the fat cat, Roberts, chief executive of the water and electricity supplier United Utilities, actually saw his pay fall fractionally last year to £598,600. His pension pot of £458,000 is also modest by FTSE 100 standards. A talented mimic amongst other things, Mr Roberts ranks towards the bottom end of the fat cat scale.

90. NIGEL NORTHRIDGE, GALLAHER

£1.33m
Shareholder return 100.4%

A Gallaher man since joining as a salesman aged 19, Nigel Northridge has transformed the formerly sleepy Irish company after taking over as chief executive in 2001. The tobacco giant has huffed and puffed its way across Europe, pocketing Russia's Liggett Ducat and Austria Tabak along the way. His biggest perk comes in the form of B&H's sponsorship of Jordan Racing, the Formula One team.

91. CHRISTOPHER O'DONNELL, SMITH & NEPHEW

£1.22m
Shareholder return 121.4%

A quietly spoken 56-year-old, Christopher O'Donnell was appointed chief executive of Smith & Nephew in 1997 after almost a decade at the company. He won plaudits for the strategy of selling off less profitable consumer lines, such as Elastoplast and Nivea creams, to focus on making artificial hips and knees. He is married and has four children, and is a keen tennis player and golfer.

92. CHRISTOPHER RODRIGUES, BRADFORD & BINGLEY

£1.14m
Shareholder return 54.7%

Rodrigues, 53, has run the former building society Bradford & Bingley since 1996 and led its demutualisation and flotation two years ago. More than 2.7m members received an average of 250 shares worth £598 when the society decided to convert to a bank. Mr Rodrigues, a rowing blue in his Cambridge days, recently removed controls preventing a hostile bid for the company, sparking speculation that a takeover is on the horizon.

93. SIR KENNETH MORRISON, MORRISON (WM)

£.43m
Shareholder return 26.1%

Sir Ken Morrison is the no-nonsense Yorkshireman who took over the reins at the family-owned supermarket chain Morrisons from his father in 1956. He has, with plenty of Yorkshire thrift, built up the chain to become one of the best-performing supermarkets in the country. The Morrison family owns 30 per cent of the company. Sir Ken was thrust into the limelight last year when he sparked a bidding war for rival chain Safeway.

94. ROBIN ASHTON, PROVIDENT FINANCIAL

£.37m
Shareholder return 17.8%

Robin Ashton, 45, has headed Provident Financial for three years. The company lends to borrowers that have bad credit histories and are unable to get high street loans. Mr Ashton has come under fire from consumer groups for the high interest Provident charges and courted controversy with some sections of the City for his two-year contract, which would entitle him to a £816,000 pay-off if sacked.

95. PETER RATCLIFFE, P&O PRINCESS

£1.18m
Shareholder return 83.7%

The reticent Peter Ratcliffe spent 2002 steering P&O Princess Cruises through the choppy waters of two takeover bids before agreeing to be bought by Carnival of the US in a deal worth £3.5bn. His tenacity paid off with the creation of the world's biggest cruise company. Ratcliffe, who has since swapped his chief executive's hat for a seat on the Carnival board, was paid £1.19m last year.

96. ROBERT WALKER, SEVERN TRENT

£.72m
Shareholder return 30.3%

The chief executive of water company Severn Trent is also a member of the ad hoc fat-cat panel set up by the CBI to examine boardroom pay and "payments for failure". His salary last year rose 19 per cent to £492,700 even though Severn Trent shares have underperformed. The former PepsiCo chief's package also included a Jaguar Sovereign and a £225,000 top-up to his pension pot.

97. JOHN NAPIER, KELDA

£.34m
Shareholder return 44.3%

Another utilities boss whose salary, although high by normal standards, is hardly stellar in comparison to other FTSE 100 chiefs. John Napier, the executive chairman of Kelda – the company that owns Yorkshire Water – earnt £337,000 last year. This was a salary increase of 35 per cent on the previous year, but he is still near the bottom of the fat-cat league. Napier has now become the chairman of the struggling insurance group Royal & SunAlliance.

98. ADAM APPLEGARTH, NORTHERN ROCK

£.88m
Shareholder return 141.5%

Adam Applegarth, chief executive of Northern Rock, is one of the bright young things in the normally fusty world of banking. Last year, the 40-year-old's name was mentioned in connection with almost every major job going in the sector. So far, Applegarth has chosen to remain at Northern Rock, the fast-growing outfit he joined as a graduate trainee 19 years ago. The bank last year rewarded him by upping his pay by 40 per cent to £759,000.

99. SIMON WOLFSON, NEXT

£.81m
Shareholder return 101.2%

At the age of 35 Simon Wolfson is the youngest chief executive of a FTSE 100 company. The son of Next's former chairman, Lord Wolfson of Sunningdale, Wolfson took over two years ago. The company has been targeted by the corporate governance lobby because Wolfson has a two-year contract – frowned upon because it can lead to huge pay-offs for directors who are forced to step down.

DAVID FISCHEL, LIBERTY INTERNATIONAL

£.61m
Shareholder return 65.6%

David Fischel may be the chief executive of the property company Liberty International, but its septuagenarian founding chairman, Donald Gordon, is still very much at the helm of the company whose shopping centre portfolio includes Gateshead's Metro Centre and Lakeside, Essex. Mr Fischel was rewarded for nearly 20 years of service at Liberty by being given the top job in March 2001.

Comments