BA plays safe on the truth about air crashes

People & Business

The Economist recently flagged an investigation into "How safe is your airline?" on its cover, a blood-curdling series that suggested air crashes would probably rise with world air traffic.

British Airways, which has an arrangement to distribute 5,000 copies of The Economist free to passengers, decided to take no copies. Several US airlines did the same.

Bill Emmott, editor of The Economist, is not impressed: "Some third-world countries ban us when we write about their nasty countries - we're regularly banned by Indonesia. I'm surprised to find BA in that company. This is unprecedented, and rather weak-willed of them. Boeing gave us a call, congratulating us on our balance and good research."

A BA spokesperson hit back: "We didn't want to cause unnecessary anxiety to our passengers. It [the issue] looks in depth at air crashes over the past few years. In the same way, we don't show aircraft disaster movies to passengers."

On a happier note for BA, Concorde celebrates the 21st anniversary of its first commercial flight today. In that time more than 2 million passengers have flown on BA's supersonic flagship in the utmost safety.

BA says: "More than 80 per cent of Concorde passengers are business people and an increasing number go to the US and back in a day. For them, the cost of a day-return ticket to New York represents real value for money, saving the two days of travelling and the added expense of hotel accommodation."

Wonderful. That certainly puts my fears about rising bus fares in perspective.

Is Lord Palumbo planning a new City club? He is already a director of Capital Club, a private establishment near the Bank of England opened three years ago by owner Dieter Klosterman, who also owns Brocket Hall. Capital Club offers elegant dining and hotel facilities right at the heart of the City.

I ask this question because City Acre Property Investment Trust, a company owned by Lord Palumbo, has applied to the City Corporation for permission to change the use of 37a Walbrook, a building he already owns and a stone's throw from Capital Club, "from office building to private club".

Needless to say the launch of a new club just behind Mansion House and so close to Capital Club might be seen as competition. As a spokesman for Capital Club puts it: "I don't think the City needs another club. I don't think it wants one."

Mike Longshaw, managing director of Capital Club, adds: "It's certainly news to me. I haven't heard anything about this. Perhaps it'll be a second Ministry of Sound."

For those readers living outside London and over the age of 30, I should explain that the Ministry of Sound is a "hip" nightclub owned by Lord Palumbo's son, Jamie Palumbo, in Elephant & Castle.

Sadly, a call to 37a Walbrook, where Lord Palumbo has set up office while his nearby property development at Number One Poultry is completed, failed to elicit a response. Never mind. I look forward to my invitation to the first "rave" night in his exciting new club soon.

Just as you're beginning to recover from the ill-effects of festive over-indulgence, along comes Burns Night to ruin all your New Year resolutions. Neill Clark, a firm of Glaswegian lawyers which has done due diligence work for 34 AIM flotations, is having a London Burns "luncheon" for journalists today, in advance of the Scottish bard's birthday on Saturday.

The beano at the City's Waterman's Hall will include a cornucopia of Scottish fayre such as Cock-a-Leekie, Haggis, Hoggart (lamb) and Cranachan (treacle shortbread), as well as a "blind" mature whisky-tasting.

Ross Macdonald, Neill Clark's managing director, has promised to "address the haggis" which will be piped into the court room. A spokesman says: "The date has been carefully selected in advance of the official Burns Night to allow the directors and management team to recover in time for the Scottish lawyers' bash later in the week." You mean there's more? Pass the Alka Seltzer.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
Arts and Entertainment
film
Arts and Entertainment
Preening: Johnny Depp in 'Mortdecai'
filmMortdecai becomes actor's fifth consecutive box office bomb
News
peopleWarning - contains a lot of swearing
Travel
travel
Arts and Entertainment
arts + ents
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

Ashdown Group: Client Services Manager - Relationship Management - London

£30000 - £32000 per annum + benefits : Ashdown Group: A highly successful, int...

Recruitment Genius: Credit Controller / Customer Service

£18000 - £20000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This rapidly expanding business...

Guru Careers: In-House / Internal Recruiter

£25 - 28k + Bonus: Guru Careers: An In-house / Internal Recruiter is needed to...

Recruitment Genius: Tax Assistant

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: A Tax Assistant is required to join a leading ...

Day In a Page

Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project