City People

LORD HURD, the former Foreign Secretary, has gathered a clutch of the City's most venerable figures to sit on a new advisory board for Hawkpoint Partners, the corporate finance boutique which emerged from the old NatWest Markets last year.

Hawkpoint was created from the combination of JO Hambro Magan and NatWest Markets Corporate Finance, when the parent bank finally abandoned hopes of building a global investment bank.

NatWest still owns 100 per cent of the equity, but the Hawkpoint people get at least 50 per cent of the profits.

Since its launch 16 months ago, the boutique has become the leading adviser on takingpublic companies private - the Candover acquisition of Hall Engineering for pounds 135m was a recent example.

Now it wants the nine-strong advisory board to "open doors to European corporates", says Patrick Wilson, a managing director at Hawkpoint.

The board includes Sir Michael Richardson, formerly of Rothschilds and Smith New Court, Donald Macpherson, formerly of Fielding Newson Smith, Sir Christopher Benson, chairman of Albright & Wilson, and Derek Bonham, who was formerly the head of Hanson.

Hawkpoint - the firm chose the name to suggest "sharp and focused" - is led by chief executive Alton Irby, a cousin of Charles Irby, another corporate financier, who is about to retire from Barings.

u

SPEAKING OF senior corporate financiers, Derek Netherton retired from Schroders after 26 years in 1996, and since then has taken a number of non-executive directorships, including Next and St James's Place Capital.

Yesterday Mr Netherton joined Hiscox, a Lloyd's underwriting company, in the same capacity.

He says he met Robert Hiscox, who runs the group, a few years ago, but cautions: "I'm not sure as yet I have any total understanding of the insurance industry." This despite once having been an insurance analyst in the "dim and distant past".

As for retirement, Mr Netherton admits that he does the two usual things, cultivating roses and working on the golf handicap. However, following a fall a couple of weeks ago, "both the roses and the handicap are the worse for wear," he laughs.

u

ALEX TUDOR, the 21-year-old cricketer whose 99 not out against New Zealand last Saturday brought such relief to England's victory-starved fans, is the beneficiary of a novel sponsorship scheme by the accountants KPMG.

A spokesman for the beancounters says proudly: "We have a long association with Mr Tudor's county, Surrey, and we decided last year to sponsor one of their promising young players - and we picked him."

As for the fact that as a bowler Mr Tudor is unlikely to get another chance to score a century, John Battersby, a tax partner at KPMG, offers some novel words of comfort.

"The advantage of working for an accountancy firm is that you can easily turn 99 into 100 as the difference is not material in accounting terms."

So that's it, then. Tim Henman should've been sponsored by PricewaterhouseCooper...

u

TALKING OF cricket, the Securities Institute is gearing up for this year's Financial Ashes on 15 July, held between teams of English, Australian and South African brokers drawn from the Square Mile.

It reminds me of the time about five years ago when the Securities Institute faced a crisis at the event: the beer tent ran out of lager.

Diplomatic relations with the Australian contingent plunged to a new low.

Happily under chief executive Geoffrey Turner the lager supplies have held up in more recent years and antipodean relations have improved. No doubt the Honourable Artillery Company ground will be awash with the amber nectar next week.

u

ONE OF the world's largest fund managers, State Street, began life in the US on State Street, a thoroughfare which had been named King Street until the American Revolution. Coincidentally, when moving into the UK, State Street wound up again at King Street, this time in London. When casting around for a name for their emerging markets subsidiary which, moreover, was headed by Ken King, State Street plumped logically for "King Street Advisers".

Unfortunately, it discovered that a company in the US was already called this. The two businesses agreed to a compromise, with the State Street subsidiary being renamed Rexiter Capital Management. Rexiter is, of course, the Latin for State Street.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive / Foreign Exchange Dealer - OTE £40,000+

£16000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Foreign Exchange Dealer is re...

SThree: Experienced Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £40000 per annum + OTE + Incentives + Benefits: SThree: Established f...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £25000 per annum + OTE 40/45k + INCENTIVES + BENEFITS: SThree: The su...

Recruitment Genius: Collections Agent

£14000 - £16000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This company was established in...

Day In a Page

The long walk west: they fled war in Syria, only to get held up in Hungary – now hundreds of refugees have set off on foot for Austria

They fled war in Syria...

...only to get stuck and sidetracked in Hungary
From The Prisoner to Mad Men, elaborate title sequences are one of the keys to a great TV series

Title sequences: From The Prisoner to Mad Men

Elaborate title sequences are one of the keys to a great TV series. But why does the art form have such a chequered history?
Giorgio Armani Beauty's fabric-inspired foundations: Get back to basics this autumn

Giorgio Armani Beauty's foundations

Sumptuous fabrics meet luscious cosmetics for this elegant look
From stowaways to Operation Stack: Life in a transcontinental lorry cab

Life from the inside of a trucker's cab

From stowaways to Operation Stack, it's a challenging time to be a trucker heading to and from the Continent
Kelis interview: The songwriter and sauce-maker on cooking for Pharrell and crying over potatoes

Kelis interview

The singer and sauce-maker on cooking for Pharrell
Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea