Jeremy Warner: City bashing won't help public finances

Outlook Warren Buffett says his eyesight isn't so good these days, but even if it were fine, he doesn't think he'd be seeing too many green shoots. Even Lord Mandelson, unreconstructed optimist though he appears to be, sees no more than "green seedlings".

Jeremy Warner: BAA would struggle with third runway

Outlook: Brave of all those high-powered business leaders to come leaping out of the closet to confess they have always been against a third runway at Heathrow, isn't it? Once apon a time when there was still some possibility of the third runway getting built it might have looked dangerously risqué to have broken ranks with the rest of the business lobby in this way. Today it seems like little more than political opportunism.

Jeremy Warner: What now for the Monetary Policy Committee?

Outlook: The Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee begins its regular two-day monthly meeting today. With no interest rate decision to take – rates are already so low they cannot sensibly be cut further – the MPC may find itself struggling to fill the time. But though the Committee may have been deprived of its usual decision-making purpose, there's certainly plenty to discuss.

Jeremy Warner: Fiat's marriage in heaven is triumph of hope over experience

Outlook: I'm sorry, but I just don't see it. Sergio Marchionne, chief executive of Fiat, is self-evidently an inspirational business leader with a superficially compelling vision for creating a global auto manufacturer of sufficient scale to survive and prosper.

Jeremy Warner: Informa swaps London for Zug in tax revolt

Outlook: Zug in central Switzerland, conveniently located within reach of some of the country's ritziest ski resorts, is no doubt a nice enough place for a visit. But is the publishing and events group Informa doing the right thing by relocating to this remote Swiss canton so as to avoid an estimated £10m a year in tax?

Jeremy Warner: What do we want to do with our banks?

Outlook: This week's Treasury committee report on the banking crisis reserves some of its more biting observations for UKFI, the supposedly independent organisation established to hold and manage the taxpayers' various investments in the banking industry.

Jeremy Warner: Hands off our hedge funds, protection for private equity

Outlook Once again, I find myself having to perform the unenviable task of defending the hedge fund and private equity industries. Populism nearly always makes for bad policy, and by pandering to the "locust" hating politicians of Paris and Berlin, the European Commission seems to be falling into just such a trap.

Jeremy Warner: Desperate and not so desperate rights issues

Outlook As a textbook example of the way the credit crunch has been hurting ordinary companies, they don't come more striking than DSG International, the former Dixons electricals retailing group. Debt has risen threefold in just five months, forcing the company into a distress rights issue and share placing.

Jeremy Warner: Steel giants struggle under a mountain of deal-induced debt

Outlook Sales down by a half, another $1bn-plus quarterly loss and a distress $3bn issue of new equity and convertibles to match. Anyone would think this another everyday tale of banking folk. In fact, it is the latest update from the steel giant ArcelorMittal. Unless it be banking, few industries are quite as cyclical as steel.

Jeremy Warner: BP and Shell struggle to keep up with Exxon

Outlook Should BP and Royal Dutch Shell redomicile and relist to the United States? The question is largely academic, for it is most unlikely to happen any time soon. Yet London-based oil chiefs sometimes look longingly across the pond at the apparently superior share-price performance of Exxon Mobil.

Jeremy Warner: BP's dividend looks safe enough

Outlook So far, so good. The bumper profits reported by oil companies for last year, fuelled as they were by the sky-high oil price, were plainly not going to last into these recessionary times, so there had been fears that even the mighty BP would succumb to the dividend-cutting trend set by the rest of corporate Britain, depriving investors of yet another once-trustworthy source of income in an increasingly income-scarce world. The evidence of yesterday's first-quarter figures is surprisingly reassuring; the payout may survive intact. Yet that's a big "may".

Jeremy Warner: No risk of default when inflation can do the job

Outlook I'm ever more puzzled by a note from Moody's last week suggesting that the British Government's triple-A credit rating may be in danger if after the next election firmer action than envisaged in the Budget isn't taken to bring down the fiscal deficit.

Jeremy Warner: Sorrell worries about fiscal threat to upturn

Outlook It's not this year that Sir Martin Sorrell, chief executive of the advertising giant WPP, worries about, or next. Rather it's what comes after when governments around the world are confronted by the brutal reality of what to do about the burgeoning fiscal deficits they are acquiring in trying to manage their way through the recession. Do they don the hair-shirt and attack the deficit in true Thatcherite style, or do they simply ignore it and hope that inflation eventually does the trick for them?

Jeremy Warner: That's just what we needed – a global pandemic

Outlook: Swine flu haunts an industry already rendered comatose by fuel costs and the economic downturn

Jeremy Warner: Even the boss is sceptical about GM's rescue plan

Outlook: If bondholders think they are getting a raw deal, what about existing equity holders?
News
As new Tesco boss Dave Lewis is rushed in, Jim Armitage takes a look at the best (and worst) kitchen sinkers in the FTSE
News
RAF photos of a Soviet spy trawler in 1968: there are now concerns that national hostilities have moved into the digital age
Fears are mounting that Vladimir Putin has instructed hackers to target banks like JP Morgan, Oscar Williams-Grut
News
News
With such persuasive Establishment friends, little wonder Evraz is not overly concerned Westminster will turn against it, writes Jim Armitage
News
Problems at RBS suggest that lack of focus persisted during Stephen Hester’s tenure
As a £14.5m fine for poor mortgage advice highlights organisational issues at the bank, James Moore wonders what other revelations may emerge
News
As Warren Buffett is criticised for helping the fast food chain move to Canada, it’s clear the issue of good corporate governance in the US is not going away
Life and Style
In the game: EA's 'Fifa 14' is very popular with online scouts
News
The MBA has a vital role to play in changing the face of company boardrooms
Getting a chief executive to leave with as little fuss as possible has long been a dilemma for corporate boardrooms, now data-centre operator Telecity has come up with an alternative
News
Ian McCafferty, left, and Martin Weale, second left, are the ‘irrelevant minority’ of the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee
Martin Weale voted for rate rises in 2011, but his predictions of rising inflation did not materialise, writes David Blanchflower
News
If so, you are worryingly accurate, as the most important economic measure can only be guessed at, Ben Chu reports
News
Supermarkets have cut prices so hard that we’re actually spending less. But what’s good for shoppers will be bad for shareholders, writes Simon Neville
Student
A report from the Association of Graduate Recruiters predicts a 17% rise in graduate job vacancies this year
Many of the students who graduated this summer are having great difficulty finding work and, as Amy Denman explains, it’s often down to not having the necessary work experience
News
David Cameron is planning to revive the Communications Data Bill
His comments risk stoking the potent fear that immigrants are coming here and taking our jobs, says Ben Chu
News
News
Howls of outrage would normally ensue, but the housebuilders have gotten away with it, says Russell Lynch
News
Janet Yellen, chair of the Federal Reserve Board
The Federal Reserve has become a rogue hedge fund, taking massive, wildly speculative positions
News
The Ummah Welfare Trust called on its supporters to boycott HSBC
Customer with Iranian links are being ditched by HSBC and others. They deny discrimination, but have hefty fines led to some banks being far too cautions? By Maria Tadeo
News
'Political Ravishment - Or the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street in Danger!' from 1797 by James Gillray
Like Caesar’s wife, the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street is supposed to be above suspicion. But some members of Parliament have suspicious minds, writes Ben Chu
News
Detroit’s once glorious and now decrepit Michigan Theater now operates as a car park
They forgot the motor city in the years of American urban renewal, but now JP Morgan is writing a $100m cheque to kickstart Detroit. Some doubt the bank’s motives
News
Gerard Lopez took the wheel at the Lotus team five years ago with his business partner Eric Lux
He has investments ranging from real estate to Charlie Chaplin. But right now Gerard Lopez has Lotus on his mind
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Day In a Page

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution