BT pledges to clear backlog of internet orders

Click to follow
The Independent Online

BTopenworld, the residential and small business retail internet division of British Telecom, expects to have a backlog of thousands of orders for broadband online service cleared up by January, Andy Green, the unit's chief executive, said yesterday.

BTopenworld, the residential and small business retail internet division of British Telecom, expects to have a backlog of thousands of orders for broadband online service cleared up by January, Andy Green, the unit's chief executive, said yesterday.

Mr Green said: "We're continually ramping up service," adding that "hundreds" of installations per day are taking place. "I think this thing will get normal very quickly. Come the new year, people will place orders and in 15 days or so it will be installed," he said.

His comments came as BTopenworld hosted a trade show for 90 broadband content providers. The unit has a £30m budget to develop broadband content via joint ventures.

He also predicted that Britain will lead Europe in broadband usage and local loop unbundling within a year. "The UK is a more liberal market," Mr Green said. "We will be in the number one position in Europe in broadband and have the lead in unbundling."

More than 100,000 prospective customers registered with BTopenworld when it began marketing high-speed asymetric digital subscriber line (ASDL) internet access in May. Installations, due to begin in July, were delayed by about two months due to technical problems.

This resulted in a considerable waiting list - the exact size of which the company will not reveal - that is slowly being reduced. The main product is 'home 500', which offers always-on fast internet access for £39.99 per month plus a £150 installation fee. Customers who signed up in May and June had the installation fee waived.

Meanwhile, a survey by research firm Data Monitor predicts that cable and ADSL computer modems will be used by one UK household in three by 2004. Other surveys estimate that more than one in two of the UK's 25 million households will have internet connected computers by that time.

Comments