Business Diary: Fraudsters cash in on BP's woes

Nigeria's formidable fraudsters don't miss a trick. In the latest version of the long-established scam that emanates from the country, an email is doing the rounds purporting to be from Tony Hayward's "private solicitor" appealing for people to help the embattled BP chief get £100m of wealth out of the US before President Obama snaffles it. The fraudsters rather give the game away by repeatedly mis-spelling Mr Hayward's name, but one can't help admiring their ingenuity.

Essex plays host to India

Good news for Essex, which some would say is rather punching above its weight with the conference it has just announced, billed as the first ever "Essex-India Business Summit". The event, which is to be held next week at Anglia Ruskin University in Chelmsford, will see Essex County Council's trade team host Anil Verma, India's economic minister, and a trade delegation. All Essex-based businesses have been invited to attend.

RBS keen to avoid own goal

Taxpayer-owned Royal Bank of Scotland has had the sense not to buy up corporate hospitality packages for the World Cup in South Africa, aware that being seen to spend money on flying clients half-way round the world to watch football might have been portrayed as just a little bit insensitive for a bank bailed out by the taxpayer. Still, it doesn't want to miss out on the fun entirely. Bloomberg reports that RBS has turned an atrium in its London HQ into a football pitch, complete with screens on which bankers and their clients will be able to watch games.

UBS's customer locks horns

Banks are getting used to dealing with protesters after the financial crisis, but Switzerland's UBS didn't know how to deal with the challenge presented by Bauer Klemenz Marti, one of its customers. So fed up was Mr Marti with the bank's perceived failure to deal with his complaints that he took matters into his own hands this week, chaining his pet bull to a UBS branch in Grenchen for a day. Now that's a protest.