Business Diary: HTC gets poked with legal suit

Oh dear, someone didn't do their homework. Mobile phone maker HTC made a bit of a splash last week with its new "Facebook phone", a handset that allows users to update their pages on the social networking site at the touch of a button. Just one problem: HTC has named the phone the ChaCha. Not entirely surprisingly, ChaCha, the relatively well-known internet search engine, is not best pleased, pointing out that it has trademarked the name in the US and Europe. Now it plans to sue the mobile phone giant.



Red faces over the colour of money

Slang doesn't always cross borders terribly well, with what might be a perfectly innocuous phrase in one country occasionally causing huge offence in another. So let us offer our sympathy to the Indian financial services company Sundaram Mutual for what one might describe as a faux pas in the large advertisements it took out in The Economic Times of India this week. Headlining the advert "Sundaram Mutual's Golden Showers" may just raise a few eyebrows with some of the paper's international readers.



'Spear's' harpoons bank disclosure

Good to see Spear's, the magazine that caters to the whims of the super-rich, coming out to bat for its people. While others are celebrating a more open era in which it is tougher for the wealthy to hide their cash from the taxman in Swiss bank accounts, Spear's is less impressed with such openness. The mandatory disclosure of account details to governments for tax purposes is "possibly" justifiable, but not the leaking of such data to WikiLeaks. "To breach the privacy of individuals in such a public manner, the main driver of which would seem to be vindictiveness, would be unforgivable," it complains.



Iceland founder aims high

Best of luck to Malcolm Walker, founder of the Iceland retail chain, in his latest charitable endeavour. He's taking two months out of the office – with the permission of the board, of course – to take part in an attempt to reach the North Col of Mount Everest. He'll be accompanied by his son Richard, and Walker hopes the climb – to 23,000 feet – will raise at least £1m for Alzheimer's Research UK.

businessdiary@independent.co.uk

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