Business Diary: The sharp dresser on remand

More now on the Cad and the Dandy's contest to find the City's best-dressed financial services professional, which we featured earlier this week.

News reaches us of one rather bizarre name to have made the shortlist for the gong (which comes with a prize of £3,000 worth of bespoke suits): one Kweku Adoboli. He, of course, is the man accused of rogue trading at UBS, charges that have seen him remanded in custody pending a Crown Court hearing later this month.

When the bankers bite back

US financial gossip site Dealbreaker reveals a fun row in New York, where restaurateur Mario Batali made some rather offensive remarks about bankers at a recent Time magazine bash. Cue outrage from the financial community, with bans on staff booking at his restaurants and a deluge of bad reviews of his food on Wall Street-linked web sites. Batali has now apologised.

No sign of stamp of approval

Is a conspiracy afoot at the German Post Office? It has previously announced plans to bring out a new stamp featuring a portrait of the former Chancellor Helmut Kohl, widely seen as one of the founders of the single currency. The stamp had been due out before the end of the year, but now the German finance minister says he hasn't even seen the portrait yet. Have the Germans decided that founding the euro isn't something to be applauded after all?

The battle to get Aim into Isas

Our best to David O'Hara who has begun a petition aimed at persuading the Government to change the laws on individual savings accounts. Currently, small companies listed on the London Stock Exchange's Alternative Investment Market are not permissible investments for the tax-free shelters – an anomaly that has always struck us as curious – and O'Hara wants to change that.