Business Diary: Wheeler keep sit in the family

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The Independent Online

If you're a retailer, finding the right property from which to hawk your wares can be quite a challenge. There was no problem, however, for Nick Wheeler, the founder of Charles Tyrwhitt, maker of those posh shirts, when he decided he want to open his first shop in Scotland. The perfect premises came up in Edinburgh, when The White Company decided it wanted to move a few doors down the road on George Street. And since Mr Wheeler is married to Chrissie Rucker, the founder of The White Company, securing the deal was child's play.



Philosophical about the bailout

Ten out of ten for effort. No sooner had the eurozone summit come up with a possible way forward for Greece on the debt front than its embassy was going to work to drum up trade. The latest issue of Invest in Greece, the embassy's newsletter for those who might be interested in doing a bit of business in the debt-ravaged country, has been popping into email in-boxes up and down the country over the past few days. There's no faulting the entrepreneurial spirit of the Greeks (we hear their tax regime isn't bad either).



Double-dip time at Goldman Sachs

Tough times at Goldman Sachs in New York, reports Dealbreaker, the online gossip site for Wall Street types. One correspondent is outraged that the investment bank, which has just released disappointing earnings figures, seems to be surreptitiously trying to cut costs by reducing the size of the cups used in its coffee machines, which dispense free drinks. Our eagle-eyed trader is having none of that, however – he promises to take two cups from now on.



A friend in need is an easy mark

Oh dear: here's a lesson from the US for those readers inclined to always think the best of people. The New York Post reports a surge in what Micki Shulman, a prosecutor based in Manhattan, describes as "affinity frauds" – basically when friends con friends. It's often the betrayal that hurts most, explains Shulman, because while people don't trust Wall Street types as far as they can throw them, they expect better from people they know.

businessdiary@independent.co.uk

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