Executives get plastic surgery to lift their faces and careers

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The Independent Online

Power dressing is being taken to an extreme by executives who are embracing plastic surgery to boost their careers, according to new research.

Power dressing is being taken to an extreme by executives who are embracing plastic surgery to boost their careers, according to new research.

Fears that a sagging jowl reflects a flagging career has helped fuel a 30 per cent increase in the amount of money spent on cosmetic surgery over the past five years, the study states.

As more companies invite their staff to dress down at work, market analyst Mintel's report suggests businessmen and women are looking towards a facelift as a means of impressing their bosses.

Women are more likely to turn to plastic surgery than power suits to compete with male colleagues, the research reveals.

Mintel's research shows almost 50 per cent of the women surveyed would consider cosmetic surgery.

And if they believe it will save their career, a nip and tuck may seem a sound investment. A facelift, breast surgery or a tummy tuck costs between £3,000 and £5,000.

The survey also shows the biggest increase in spending has been on sub-surgical procedures to remove wrinkles, suggesting men and women are trying to iron out the creases to avoid being passed over for promotion in favour of younger colleagues.

This year alone, £150 million will be spent on 72,000 cosmetic surgery operations.

Norman Waterhouse, Consultant Plastic Surgeon at the Wellington Hospital in London, said there had been a marked increase in the number of male sales executives seeking cosmetic surgery but warned it was not the key to career success.

He said: "If they have surgery to solve their career problems it can lead to disappointment. They may not have been fired because they looked old but for other reasons. I can't tell people it will raise their professional standing."

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