Greece debt crisis as it happened: Tsipras could resign after the Greek government vote on European bailout terms

Tsipras faces showdown in Athens as his own party shun austerity reforms ahead of critical vote

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Alexis Tsipras, the Greek prime minister, has until Wednesday to convince his party that he did not betray them by signing up to sweeping austerity measures that will see €50 billion-worth of public assets sold off.

Greece faces financial ruin if the agreement made in Brussels early on Monday morning cannot be ratified by both the Greek government and the national parliaments of the Eurozone.

Tispras has an uphill struggle ahead of him. In a 17-hour meeting in which observers said he was “crucified” by European lenders, he agreed to surrender much of Greece’s sovereignty to the watchful eye of the European Commission and the International Monetary Fund to secure €86 billion in emergency funding.

Geogios Daremas, a strategist and adviser to the Greek ministry of Labour, Social Security and Social Solidarity, said that selling the country’s assets was an affront. “It’s basically saying sell the memory of your ancestors, sell your history just so we can get something commercial for it. This is an idea to humiliate Greeks,” he said.

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