It's Thursday, so I must be worth a pay rise

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The Independent Online

Ambitious employees need to learn to "manage" their boss as much as their boss manages them. The Institute of Management published a guide yesterday to manipulating superiors intooffering instant promotion and pay rises while ensuring said boss has no idea he, or she, is being controlled.

Ambitious employees need to learn to "manage" their boss as much as their boss manages them. The Institute of Management published a guide yesterday to manipulating superiors intooffering instant promotion and pay rises while ensuring said boss has no idea he, or she, is being controlled.

Managing Your Boss takes the employee through the different types of manager and gives a one-week course of lessons. Sandi Mann, the author of the book and a senior lecturer in occupational psychology at the University of Central Lancashire, said: "This is about creating a successful two-way partnership that makes everyone's working life easier. Some people dismiss it as machiavellian to try to control your boss, but it's not just about that."

The guide is broken into seven chapters, one for every day of the week. On Sunday, we learn the bosses' attitude to staff falls into two broad categories. The "carrot and stick" are those who assume all employees are lazy and need to be coerced into helping the company achieve its goals, and the "co-operate and trust" type assume the staff are there for reasons other than simply paying the mortgage.

On Monday, there are quizzes designed to find if the boss is charismatic or consultative and how to deal with that: time to invite the boss is invited to the pub for more ego-stroking and reassurance.

Tuesday's lesson covers how to set up a psychological contract about job expectations. If your boss is impressed by his staff's early arrival in the office come in ahead of the rest, but do make sure your boss is there to see.

Near the end of the week, the attentive employee will have realised "the trick to getting more from your boss is to become more assertive at work". So ask for a rise. Having established you deserve it, stay calm, don't threaten and never demand.

By the end of the week, the book says your boss will be more impressed with you. Followed carefully, that boss may even step aside and offer you his job. And you can then look forward to being carefully controlled by your new employees.

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