Most Britons 'do not want to start own businesses'

Click to follow
The Independent Online

The challenge the Government faces in building a US-style entrepreneurial culture was highlighted today by its own survey showing that most Britons have no desire to set up their own business.

The challenge the Government faces in building a US-style entrepreneurial culture was highlighted today by its own survey showing that most Britons have no desire to set up their own business.

Almost three-quarters of people – 70 per cent – are not interested in striking out on their own, the new household survey found.

The survey, which was launched today as a bid to discover people's attitude to self-employment, found only 12 per cent of people were thinking about going into business.

However this was on top of the 18 per cent who already classed themselves as entrepreneurs. The Government said this meant one in three people were running or considering starting their own firm.

The survey found that almost nine out 10 of the population admired entrepreneurs and three-quarters would encourage their friends or relatives top start their own enterprise.

However about half of the people believe people who are highly successful in business often have low morals or ethics.

"I want to make entrepreneurs as recognised and admired as footballers and film stars," said Nigel Griffiths, the minister for small businesses. "My job is to make sure they have access to the very best advice and support on offer to help their businesses succeed."

According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), 7.7 per cent of the British population are running their own business compared with 8.5 per cent in the US.

The poll also gave a boost to Government plans to give a fresh start to entrepreneurs who fail in business ventures. More than eight in 10 believed entrepreneurs who have failed should be given the chance to start again. The Government is proposing help for bankrupts who are not reckless, irresponsible or dishonest.

Comments