PEOPLE & BUSINESS

THE FALL-OUT from the "merger" between SBC and UBS continued yesterday with nearly a score of UBS people getting jobs at two rival investment banks.

Panmure Gordon snapped up a dozen UBS staff, mostly equity traders, led by Richard Hine and Colin Grimwood. Panmure's head of trading Steven Dalby also recruited two senior institutional salesmen, Gordon Richards and Michael Hoffmann.

On the same day NatWest Securities, the European equities arm of NatWest Markets, hired seven analysts from UBS, including Richard Hannah and Matthew O'Keeffe, who have been ranked number one and number two transport analysts respectively for the past five years. NatWest also hired two analysts and two corporate brokers from other banks.

But the journey for the ex-UBS people won't end there. These individuals recruited by NatWest "will be part of the European cash equities businesses being sold to Bankers Trust", according to the bank. The sale should be completed during the second quarter of this year.

The other UBS refugees are Andrew Beale, who analyses telecoms companies, Ian Turner, who covers the UK electricity sector, Richard Franklin on specialist sales for utilities, and Barry Haddon on media.

NatWest has also hired Christian Stark from UBS in Switzerland to research medium-sized Swiss companies. Lesley Watkins and Nicola Stevens join NatWest in the UK from UBS's corporate broking side. And finally Tim Owen joins from HSBC James Capel as a food manufacturing analyst, and Marc Duschenes recently joined from BZW to work on UK food retail research.

PROPERTY agents Harman Healy are putting an interesting site up for sale in their next auction on 1 April. The 181-acre site in Greenwich, London, contains "a temporary structure currently under construction for use as an exhibition hall."

The firm, quoted in Estates Gazette magazine, says possible future uses for the hall include "storage of white elephants, a red herring pickling plant, a `poppadome' factory or a retirement home for ex-Cabinet ministers." Harman Healy says the property is let to a Mr P Mandelson on a short lease ending in December 2001.

Jonathan Radgick, Harman Healy's auctioneer, says the last time the firm held an auction on 1 April was roughly 10 years ago, when Ronald Reagan was President. "We put the White House in our catalogue, with R Reagan on a regulated tenancy." They got a few requests for more information back then, and Mr Radgick wouldn't be surprised if they got some enquiries about the dome this April.

To mark their last April Fool's Day spoof they baked a huge cake in the shape of the White House and auctioned it off for charity. "Unfortunately the dome isn't very conducive to cakes," said Mr Radgick. "It's the pylons. So this time we've written to the Millennium Dome Experience Company asking for a couple of free guided tours around the dome."

The catalogue entry for the dome site concludes with a caution, a particularly suitable one in the week of the Budget speech: "Purchasers are warned that the register of contaminated land contains records of high levels of natural gases in connection with the site, much of which emanates from the Westminster area."

YESTERDAY'S press conference for Pearson's results kicked off with a corporate video featuring Richard Lambert, editor of the Financial Times, appearing as a talking head on several American TV shows. Mr Lambert is of course spearheading the FT's expansion in the US from their offices in New York.

After the video finished, Marjorie Scardino, chief executive of Pearson, wryly remarked that it showed that Pearson had spent pounds 100m "making Richard Lambert a TV star". When a journalist asked whether FT Television would launch another channel in order to capitalise on Mr Lambert's obvious broadcasting talents, Ms Scardino declared: "What a horrible thought."

She then followed up: "No. We can make much more money hiring him out to all the other channels."

SAM JAFFA, senior spokesperson for Price Waterhouse, has had a spot of bother with his book, Safe as Houses, a short history of financial scandals published a year ago.

The affable Mr Jaffa admits: "The publishers, Robson Books, told me that the phrase `safe as houses' doesn't mean anything to Americans. So the parperback version of the book is going to be called Great Financial Scandals."

That's more like it. Although you would have thought Mr Jaffa, who spent two years in the US as a BBC correspondent, would have been more au fait with American use of English. "Obviously I didn't spend long enough," admits the ever- modest author.

J SAINSBURY has appointed Sir George Bull, the chairman of Diageo and former group chief executive of Grand Metropolitan, as deputy chairman with effect from April 20.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
Arts and Entertainment
The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
tv
Sport
footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
Voices
Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
Arts and Entertainment
Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
tvName confirmed for third series
Sport
Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
Arts and Entertainment
art
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Neil Pavier: Management Accountant

£45,000 - £55,000: Neil Pavier: Are you looking for your next opportunity for ...

Sheridan Maine: Commercial Accountant

£45,000 - £55,000: Sheridan Maine: Are you a newly qualified ACA/ACCA/ACMA qua...

Laura Norton: Project Accountant

£50,000 - £60,000: Laura Norton: Are you looking for an opportunity within a w...

Day In a Page

Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine