People & Business

The Government launched its new taskforce for the creative industries - media, music and television - yesterday after initially announcing the move to a rather muted reception three months ago. There are worrying signs, however, that this latest luvvies' crusade could turn into a flat souffle.

Chris Smith, culture secretary, held the launch meeting at the Department for Culture, Media and Sport in Trafalgar Square. The luvvies, however, were nowhere to be seen. Shame on you, Richard Branson. Tut tut, David Puttnam. On the other hand, perhaps I shouldn't be too hard on the absent personalities. They were probably off doing some proper work.

Bill Simpson, chief executive of British bed maker Silentnight, tells me Tony Blair could have done far better than buying an imported Duxiana bed for more than pounds 3,000.

Mr Simpson is miffed that the PM didn't give more support to British industry by buying his bed locally: "Mr Blair could have bought a Sealy [bed] and he would have enjoyed the experience just as much."

The Silentnight boss says people in this country replace their beds on average once every 15 years whereas in the US they buy new beds every 10 years. Perhaps that's because American citizens tend to be larger.

Best wishes to Daniel Godfrey, marketing director of Flemings, who fell off his 1500cc Kawasaki motorbike. "I had to spend several hours in casualty - I had a couple of cracked ribs and rather a large hole in my left leg," our hero tells me. The bike was hardly damaged but he won't be riding it again. Now he's interesting himself in safer pursuits, such as helping launch Flemings' Eastern Europe Fund on 18 October.

Jonathan Helliwell, HSBC James Capel's senior European media analyst, is moving to Goldman Sachs. Mr Helliwell started as a printing and paper analyst at Kleinwort Benson in 1986 before moving on to Swiss Bank Corporation and then Capel.

Mr Helliwell will join Goldman's media team of Guy Lamming and Mathew Walker. In typical musical-chairs fashion, Mr Lamming started off at James Capel, left for Goldman, then went to SBC Warburg and last May went back to Goldman. Mr Lamming used to work alongside Neil Blackley, who left Goldman for Merrill Lynch in August last year.

Goldman has also signed Francis Woollen, a top rated European telecoms analyst, currently at UBS.

The independent insolvency firm, Buchler Phillips, has just poached a receiver from Arthur Andersen. Andersen is the giant American firm where David Buchler and Peter Phillips used to work before they founded Buchler Phillips 10 years ago.

BP has signed up Jamie Gleave, an insolvency practitioner at Andersen, to head up its new Manchester office. Simon Freakly, another Buchler Phillips partner and former Andersen man, admits his niche boutique has an excellent relationship with the Chicago-based firm. "We often refer assignments to each other." But doesn't Andersen mind having its insolvency partners nicked all the time? "We are friendly competitors," he replies.

It's a packed calendar for the UK's receivers, despite the relative dearth of companies going bust. Next Wednesday the Insolvency Practitioners Association holds its annual Bernard Phillips Memorial Lecture. The lecture is named after the late Bernard Phillips, Peter Phillips' father, who was also a noted insolvency practitioner and who worked for Arthur Andersen.

Friendly societies are preparing to play a key role in New Labour's plans for welfare reform. So says Bob Pollard, chief executive of the Ancient Order of Foresters, who has just been elected president of the Association of Friendly Societies.

Mr Pollard will be backed up by Roy Hurley, chief executive of Liverpool Victoria Friendly Society, who has been elected vice president.

Perhaps I could take these societies more seriously if they didn't sound like Freemasons' lodges in a Monty Python sketch. I mean, what's the Manchester Society of Odd Fellows all about? To be fair, the societies' titles often date back to the 16th century. They were set up "to provide self help on a mutual basis" - a phrase which chimes with New Labour.

Mr Pollard says: "The Government is open to new ideas and believes that current welfare provision is not serving the poorest members of society as it should." Mr Pollard wants us to move towards a "a system that gives a hand up, not a hand out". Those words wouldn't have been out of place coming from Margaret Thatcher.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
life
Arts and Entertainment
Cold case: Aaron McCusker and Christopher Eccleston in ‘Fortitude’
tvReview: Sky Atlantic's ambitious new series Fortitude has begun with a feature-length special
Voices
Three people wearing masks depicting Ed Miliband, David Cameron and Nick Clegg
voicesPolitics is in the gutter – but there is an alternative, says Nigel Farage
Voices
The veterans Mark Hayward, Hugh Thompson and Sean Staines (back) with Grayson Perry (front left) and Evgeny Lebedev
charity appealMaverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
News
i100
News
people
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Sport
Chelsea manager Jose Mourinho
footballThe more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Life and Style
Vote green: Benoit Berenger at The Duke of Cambridge in London's Islington
food + drinkBanishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turn over a new leaf
News
Joel Grey (left) poses next to a poster featuring his character in the film
peopleActor Joel Grey comes out at 82
News
i100
News
business
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

Recruitment Genius: Compliance Assistant

£13000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This Pension Specialist was established ...

Ashdown Group: Market Research Executive

£23000 - £26000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Market Research Executive...

Recruitment Genius: Technical Report Writer

£25000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Technical Report Writer is re...

MBDA UK Ltd: Indirect Procurement Category Manager

Competitive salary & benefits!: MBDA UK Ltd: MBDA UK LTD Indirect Procurement...

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee