People & Business

Peter Baillie, BZW's head of corporate communications for the past five years, has left the investment bank to take up the same role at GKN, the engineering group that owns Westland Helicopters. Far from being a victim of last week's acquisition of BZW's equities and corporate finance activities by Credit Suisse First Boston, Mr Baillie is leaving with the bank's blessing, I'm told.

"I've been talking with GKN for a few months," says Mr Baillie. "I spent most of my career in manufacturing and it will be good to get back to it."

The affable Scot has gardening leave until January, when he swaps BZW's Canary Wharf glass towers for GKN's swank offices in St James's, central London.

Bob Diamond, the New Yorker who now heads up the business left at Barclays, renamed Barclays Capital, has decided not to replace the irreplaceable Mr Baillie.

GKN will be familiar stuff for Mr Baillie, who has decades of defence and automotive experience. When he was spokesman at Plessey's, he was the only member of the corporate staff to be kept on by Lord Weinstock when GEC swooped. Before that, he spent 10 years Austin Rover.

'Tis the season to write about shopping surveys. Neil Mason, an analyst with Mintel, the retail research company, says the British public spends pounds 1.6bn on food and pounds 345m on decorations during the festive period. If anything, we're becoming more obsessed by spending at Christmas. Nearly one-third of retail sales and more than one-quarter of total consumer expenditure is made in the fourth quarter, a share which is rising, says Mr Mason.

So what should you be flogging this year? Mr Mason has found that sales of chocolate confectionery have gone up by 16.3 per cent in 1995-6. Other winners include mince pies, up 10.3 per cent, biscuit assortments, up 10.2 per cent, and "snack nuts" (what other kind are there?), up 14.5 per cent. Mincemeat sees off all comers, up a mighty 18.2 per cent. The only party poopers in Mr Mason's Christmas stocking are whole turkeys, whose sales fell 8. 9 per cent over the same period.

Against a background of financial crisis in the Far East, Nomura International has made what it calls "a landmark appointment" by promoting a non-Japanese, a former American Marine called Max C Chapman, to become chairman and chief executive. Mr Chapman, 54, will operate in London where Nomura International, the global subsidiary of Tokyo-based Nomura Securities, has its base. Mr Chapman succeeds Takashi Tsutsui, who has spent the past four years in the post.

Mr Chapman was president and chief operating officer of Kidder, Peabody, the Wall Street firm, until he joined Nomura International in 1989. His specific brief today is to beef up Nomura's European business.

Meanwhile Sir Douglas Wass, former Treasury mandarin and ex-chairman of Axa Equity & Law, will retire as non-executive co-chairman of Nomura next May at the age of 75 after 11 years at the helm.

Antony Snow, chairman of Hill & Knowlton, addressed a galaxy of the great and the good on Tuesday at the PR firm's 70th birthday party at Apsley House, the first Duke of Wellington's mansion on Hyde Park Corner.

Amazingly for a spin doctor, Mr Snow cracked a reasonably funny joke. (Only joking, chaps.) He told the assembled tycoons, editors and grand panjandrums that when he left Oxford he wrote to his father, thanking the latter for his generosity in supporting Snow jnr over the years. Mr Snow also told his pater that he was to become an advertising agent.

"He replied that he was pleased to have been of what assistance he could, but questioned whether advertising was really the highest to which I could aspire for so much investment," Mr Snow told the audience.

Some 25 years later Mr Snow told his dad that he had swapped advertising for PR. "I received an ecstatic acknowledgement, saying he had always had the greatest confidence that I would progress from advertising and he was particularly delighted because he had long believed that there was much to be said for proportional representation."

Martin Sorrell, head of WPP, the advertising and marketing group, was breakfasting at the Connaught with a colleague of mine this week when he espied an Armani raincoat hanging over the back of a neighbouring chair. Mr Sorrell summoned a waiter and had a heated conversation about the ownership of the coat. The WPP chief's cry was that this was somebody else's raincoat - so where was his Armani raincoat? Finally the advertising grandee gave up and left with the disputed raincoat. So who has got the real one, and is there anything interesting in the pockets?

PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
fashionHealth concerns and 'pornified' perceptions have made women more conscious at the beach
Arts and Entertainment
tv
Sport
Ojo Onaolapo celebrates winning the bronze medal
commonwealth games
Arts and Entertainment
Rock band Led Zeppelin in the early 1970s
musicLed Zeppelin to release alternative Stairway To Heaven after 43 years
Arts and Entertainment
High-flyer: Chris Pratt in 'Guardians of the Galaxy'
filmHe was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
Sport
Van Gaal said that his challenge in taking over Bobby Robson's Barcelona team in 1993 has been easier than the task of resurrecting the current United side
footballA colourful discussion on tactics, the merits of the English footballer and rebuilding Manchester United
Life and Style
Sainsbury's could roll the lorries out across its whole fleet if they are successful
tech
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Travel
The shipping news: a typical Snoozebox construction
travelSpending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Arts and Entertainment
'Old Fashioned' will be a different kind of love story to '50 Shades'
film
Arts and Entertainment
Tracey Emin's 'My Bed' is returning to the Tate more than 15 years after it first caused shockwaves at the gallery
artTracey Emin's bed returns to the Tate after record sale
Arts and Entertainment
Smart mover: Peter Bazalgette
filmHow live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences
Environment
Neil Young performing at Hyde Park, London, earlier this month
environment
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

Project Manager (HR)- Bristol - Upto £400 p/day

£350 - £400 per annum + competitive: Orgtel: Project Manager (specializing in ...

Graduate / Trainee Recruitment Consultant - IT

£25000 per annum + OTE £40,000: SThree: Orgtel are seeking Graduate Trainee Re...

HR Business Partner - Banking Finance - Brentwood - £45K

£45000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: ** HR Business Partner - Senior H...

PA / Team Secretary - Wimbledon

£28000 - £32000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: PA / Team Secretary - Mat...

Day In a Page

Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star
How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

How live cinema screenings can boost arts audiences

Broadcasting plays and exhibitions to cinemas is a sure-fire box office smash
Shipping container hotels: Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Pop-up hotels filling a niche

Spending the night in a shipping container doesn't sound appealing, but these mobile crash pads are popping up at the summer's biggest events
Native American headdresses are not fashion accessories

Feather dust-up

A Canadian festival has banned Native American headwear. Haven't we been here before?
Boris Johnson's war on diesel

Boris Johnson's war on diesel

11m cars here run on diesel. It's seen as a greener alternative to unleaded petrol. So why is London's mayor on a crusade against the black pump?
5 best waterproof cameras

Splash and flash: 5 best waterproof cameras

Don't let water stop you taking snaps with one of these machines that will take you from the sand to meters deep
Louis van Gaal interview: Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era

Louis van Gaal interview

Manchester United manager discusses tactics and rebuilding after the David Moyes era
Will Gore: The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series

Will Gore: Outside Edge

The goodwill shown by fans towards Alastair Cook will evaporate rapidly if India win the series
The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz