Who's Suing Whom: Bitter symphony as The Verve is sued by Oldham

ANDREW LOOG OLDHAM, the mythic 1960s pop svengali who discovered and produced the Rolling Stones, is suing The Verve's record company for at least three quarters of a million pounds. Mr Oldham claims that the contemporary band's biggest hit "Bitter Sweet Symphony" uses a theme composed by Mr Oldham in 1963.

The Verve, a "Britpop" rock band from Wigan, had a huge global hit with "Bitter Sweet Symphony" in the summer of 1997. Their album containing the track was still in the top 30 last October. They and their record company Virgin have never disputed that the orchestral theme of the song was borrowed from a version of the Stones classic "The Last Time", recorded by "The Andrew Loog Oldham Orchestra" in the early 1960s.

Virgin and the band believed that Decca, the Stones' original record company, owned the recording of Mr Oldham's version, which he composed and performed. They paid an agreed royalty to Decca before "Bitter Sweet Symphony" was released.

A full 18 months later Mr Oldham, who has lived in Bogota, Columbia, for the past 15 years, slapped a writ on Virgin in the London High Court, claiming he owned the recording, not Decca.

The former rock manager is demanding damages and an injunction forbidding the further sale of The Verve's song.

Coincidentally, the publishing royalties to "The Last Time" belong to a subsequent manager of the Stones, Allan Klein, who also went on to manage The Beatles. Mr Klein is not involved in the legal dispute.

STOCK AITKEN & Waterman, the songwriting and production partnership who dominated the 1980s pop charts with acts such as Bananarama, Kylie Minogue and Rick Astley, are being sued by their former solicitors over unpaid bills.

The London law firm Clintons recently issued a winding up petition against Stock Aitken & Waterman Productions Ltd (SAWPL), their former client. The case is due to come to the High Court next Wednesday.

The music partnership, now dissolved, originally consisted of Mike Scott, Matthew Aitken and Peter Waterman. The hugely lucrative "hit factory" made millions of pounds in the second half of the 1980s and first half of the 1990s.

Then, when the songwriters went their separate ways, a number of legal issues needed to be resolved. In July 1997 Stock Aitken & Waterman Productions, which no longer included Mr Waterman, instructed Clintons to sue two companies formerly owned by Mr Waterman for over pounds 1m. SAWPL claimed that PAL Productions and PWL Records owed a total of pounds 1,060,800 in loans to it, and demanded repayment.

Last week a spokesman for Clintons said: "We no longer act for Stock Aitken & Waterman Productions because they failed to discharge accounts. We have issued a winding up petition against them."

SAWPL has since retained another London law firm to represent them, Schilling & Lom. Schilling & Lom was unable to comment on the case.

A BRITISH investor who lives in Perigeux, France, is suing Prudential- Bache Securities (UK) and one of its employees, Margery Beutell, over a $500,000 investment scheme that went wrong.

Charles Alan Lawson is claiming pounds 61,525 from Ms Beuteil and further unspecified damages from both her and Pru-Bache over a scheme set up in 1994 to invest in bank instruments.

In a writ issued on Mr Lawson's behalf in London by his solicitors Dowse Baxter, he claims that "in the event it transpired that the scheme was bogus and fraudulent".

The investor also claims that the two financial advisers who devised the scheme, Paul Barnes-Taylor and Edwin Wilkinson, were made bankrupt following its collapse. Mr Lawson says that he first engaged Ms Beutell as his financial adviser in 1993.

He stipulated that she would only recommend investments that balanced income and growth, were not speculative, had been adequately researched and were sound investments.

The following year Ms Beutell introduced Mr Lawson to Mr Barnes-Taylor, whom she had known for 20 years. Mr Barnes-Taylor proposed that Mr Lawson invest in a financial derivative by joining a syndicate of "very rich individuals".

At a subsequent lunch with Mr Lawson at Drones restaurant in London, Ms Beutell said she thought the scheme "sufficiently good to recommend it to the widow of her former direct supervisor at Pru-Bache, Mr Will Custard".

But soon after Mr Lawson had invested his $500,000, he says, the scheme went belly up. He is seeking his money back.

MARINE MIDLAND, a wholly- owned subsidiary of HSBC, is suing a New York investment house and an individual for a total of $6,292,718.94, in respect of a Supreme Court judgement.

Marine Midland has also included Barclays Bank in the action in order to gain access to confidential information held by Barclays concerning the case.

The two defendants are Phoenix Investment International Inc, based in New York, and Mohnish Mohan, an individual, of Madison Avenue, New York.

Suggested Topics
PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
Out and about: for 'Glee' character Bert Hummel, having a gay son was a learning curve
lifeEven 'cool' parents need help parenting gay teens
Sport
Nathaniel Clyne celebrates after salvaging a point with the Southampton equaliser
footballAston Villa vs Southampton report
News
peopleJack Monroe accuses David Cameron of 'misty-eyed rhetoric'
News
Tana Ramsay gave evidence in a legal action in which her husband, Gordon, is accusing her father, Christopher Hutcheson, of using a ghost writer machine to “forge” his signature
peopleTana Ramsay said alleged discovery was 'extremely distressing'
Arts and Entertainment
Robin Windsor and Aljaz Skorjanec rehearse their same-sex dance together on Strictly Come Dancing
TV
News
ebooksNow available in paperback
Money
Anyone over the age of 40 seeking a loan with a standard term of 25 years will be borrowing beyond a normal retirement age of 65, and is liable to find their options restricted
propertyAnd it's even worse if you're 40
Arts and Entertainment
Perhaps longest awaited is the adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road with Brazil’s Walter Salles directing and Sam Riley, Kristen Stewart and Viggo Mortensen as the Beat-era outsiders
books
Arts and Entertainment
theatreSinger to join cast of his Broadway show after The Last Ship flounders at the box office
Life and Style
fashion'To start singing with Pharrell is not that bad, no?'
News
news
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

Argyll Scott International: Risk Assurance Manager

Negotiable: Argyll Scott International: Hi All, I'm currently recruiting for t...

Argyll Scott International: Business Analyst - MGA - London Market - Insurance Broker

£50000 - £60000 per annum + benefits: Argyll Scott International: A Business A...

Ashdown Group: PR, Marketing & Events Executive - Southwark, London - £35,000

£30000 - £35000 per annum + benefits: Ashdown Group: PR Marketing & Events Exe...

Selby Jennings: C++ Developer – Hedge Fund – New York

$80000 - $110000 per annum, Benefits: Bonus and Employee Investment Scheme: Se...

Day In a Page

In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible