Column One: V. good. Bridget makes a move upmarket

Alcohol units: several thousand (OK-ish). Cigarettes: zillions (most of them legal). Weight: mega-mega-blockbuster (v.g. for some).

YES, INDEED: she's back. Bridget Jones, last seen riding off into the sunset of W11 in a melancholy haze of vodka fumes and "lite" fag fug, will soon have a second session between hard covers. And, this time, Bridget is moving upmarket for her launch party - right up to the 28th floor bar of the Hilton Hotel, "Park Lane, London, England". Wow. "Dress v. glamorous but not too tarty, in manner of garish divorcee," she advises on her v. tasteful invite. Will do, Bridge.

The week after next, Picador will publish Helen Fielding's follow-up to Bridget Jones's Diary. It will carry the mystifying title of The Edge of Reason, which sounds like some really, really deep novel by Jean- Paul Belmondo or some other Exsistin... Existench... pissed-off but quite cute French bloke with sticky-up hair, a manky leather jacket and a crumpled pack of Gitanes.

The utterly gobsmacking impact of Helen Fielding's ditsy media babe - first as a column in This Newspaper, next in a Lesser Organ, finally in book form - left many British men with a teaser of quite ginormous proportions. Why should hundreds of thousands of otherwise sensible and efficient professional women want to identify with a scatty airhead who lurches woozily from one office calamity, naff party and Unsuitable Boy to another?

Anyway, Bridget Mark Two may at last reveal the Secret of her Success. And she has even summoned the top chap in the happening but a bit scary PR business to help her sell herself.

She (or Fielding's new book, at least) is a client of Matthew Freud. Yes, the gofer to Chris Evans, almost-best pal of Peter Mandelson, spin- doctor to the stars and, glitziest of all - image consultant to Frank Dobson. Plus it was Matthew's great-grandad with the beard that first had people on his couch. Well wicked etc. First reader to spot a front- page tabloid picture of Geri Halliwell with a copy of The Edge of Reason wins an extra-stiff Sea Breeze.

Fans will rejoice. Tills will ring. And a bookshop sales battle of Geri vs. Emma dimensions will unfold in the run-up to Christmas. Snugly ensconced at the head of the fiction charts, Sue Townsend's Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years has outsold all rivals for the past three weeks. Now the celebrity offal chef and New Labour renegade may find himself dislodged by a thirtysomething Notting Hillbilly of uncertain prospects and unsteady gait.

Surely their publishers should do something to stop such nice - if rather troubled - young folk from slugging it out in the stacks? Ms Jones can give young Mole a year or two, and the little fusspot might be a little shocked by her, er, lifestyle. Still, on the principle that opposites attract, the Date of the millennium must loom before long. Who could resist a Meet Cute between Bridget and Adrian, say in the Dome on New Year's Eve? All it needs is a speedy scriptwriter, a global rights deal - and a little stardust sprinkled by Mr Freud.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
News
election 2015The 10 best quotes of the campaign
News
A caravan being used as a polling station in Ford near Salisbury, during the 2010 election
election 2015The Independent's guide to get you through polling day
News
people
Voices
David Blunkett joins the Labour candidate for Redcar Anna Turley on a campaigning visit last month
voicesWhat I learnt from my years in government, by the former Home Secretary David Blunkett
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA celebration of British elections
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager (B2B) - Romford - £40,000 + car

£35000 - £40000 per annum + car and benefits: Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager...

Ashdown Group: Helpdesk Analyst - Devon - £20,000

£18000 - £20000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Helpdesk Analyst - Devon - £20,000 ...

Ashdown Group: Data Scientist - London - £50,000 + bonus

£35000 - £50000 per annum + generous bonus: Ashdown Group: Business Analytics ...

Ashdown Group: IT Project Coordinator (Software Development) - Kingston

£45000 - £50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: IT Project Coordinator (Software Dev...

Day In a Page

General Election 2015: ‘We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon’, says Ed Balls

'We will not sit down with Nicola Sturgeon'

In an exclusive interview, Ed Balls says he won't negotiate his first Budget with SNP MPs - even if Labour need their votes to secure its passage
VE Day 70th anniversary: How ordinary Britons celebrated the end of war in Europe

How ordinary Britons celebrated VE Day

Our perception of VE Day usually involves crowds of giddy Britons casting off the shackles of war with gay abandon. The truth was more nuanced
They came in with William Caxton's printing press, but typefaces still matter in the digital age

Typefaces still matter in the digital age

A new typeface once took years to create, now thousands are available at the click of a drop-down menu. So why do most of us still rely on the old classics, asks Meg Carter?
Discovery of 'missing link' between the two main life-forms on Earth could explain evolution of animals, say scientists

'Missing link' between Earth's two life-forms found

New microbial species tells us something about our dark past, say scientists
The Pan Am Experience is a 'flight' back to the 1970s that never takes off - at least, not literally

Pan Am Experience: A 'flight' back to the 70s

Tim Walker checks in and checks out a four-hour journey with a difference
Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics - it's everywhere in the animal world

Humans aren't alone in indulging in politics

Voting, mutual back-scratching, coups and charismatic leaders - it's everywhere in the animal world
Crisp sales are in decline - but this tasty trivia might tempt back the turncoats

Crisp sales are in decline

As a nation we're filling up on popcorn and pitta chips and forsaking their potato-based predecessors
Ronald McDonald the muse? Why Banksy, Ron English and Keith Coventry are lovin' Maccy D's

Ronald McDonald the muse

A new wave of artists is taking inspiration from the fast food chain
13 best picnic blankets

13 best picnic blankets

Dine al fresco without the grass stains and damp bottoms with something from our pick of picnic rugs
Barcelona 3 Bayern Munich 0 player ratings: Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?

Barcelona vs Bayern Munich player ratings

Lionel Messi scores twice - but does he score highest in our ratings?
Martin Guptill: Explosive New Zealand batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Explosive batsman who sets the range for Kiwis' big guns

Martin Guptill has smashed early runs for Derbyshire and tells Richard Edwards to expect more from the 'freakish' Brendon McCullum and his buoyant team during their tour of England
General Election 2015: Ed Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

Miliband's unlikely journey from hapless geek to heart-throb

He was meant to be Labour's biggest handicap - but has become almost an asset
General Election 2015: A guide to the smaller parties, from the the National Health Action Party to the Church of the Militant Elvis Party

On the margins

From Militant Elvis to Women's Equality: a guide to the underdogs standing in the election
Amr Darrag: Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister in exile still believes Egypt's military regime can be replaced with 'moderate' Islamic rule

'This is the battle of young Egypt for the future of our country'

Ex-Muslim Brotherhood minister Amr Darrag still believes the opposition can rid Egypt of its military regime and replace it with 'moderate' Islamic rule, he tells Robert Fisk
Why patients must rely less on doctors: Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'

Why patients must rely less on doctors

Improving our own health is the 'blockbuster drug of the century'