'Brains register' for bright children

Click to follow
The Independent Online

A register of talented pupils in England is being launched by the Government.

Head teachers at every secondary school will get letters this week asking them to register their brightest and most talented pupils with the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth (Nagty), according to the BBC.

The aim is to help children from poorer backgrounds fulfil their potential.

Schools Minister Andrew Adonis said: "We must stop the terrible waste of talent when children don't reach their full potential.

"This register will ensure they are spotted early and don't lose out because they come from a deprived background.

"Our brightest children should be helped to reach the top and use their gifts. The pursuit of excellence which benefits the whole country should be open to children of all backgrounds, not just a privileged minority."

The scheme will involve having specially-trained teachers in every secondary school and in groups of primary schools.

But the plans have been criticised.

Former chief inspector of schools Chris Woodhead said the problem was not identifying the bright pupils, but offering them appropriate support.

Mr Woodhead, professor of education at the University of Buckingham, said: "The problem is doing something for them and if secondary schools are not doing enough for the brightest children now why are they going to do anything for them if they are on a register?"

He said if there were more grammar schools gifted children would prosper anyway because "there, bright children are educated in schools for bright children".

The register follows research from education charity the Sutton Trust which suggested just one-in-five children from poorer homes go on to higher education compared with half of those from the top three social classes.

The Government wants schools to identify the top 5% of 11 to 19-year-olds who are eligible for Nagty membership.

Comments