Judge rules for teachers over 'disruptive' pupil

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The High Courts have ruled in favour of a teaching union in the case of a pupil who was refused lessons at school because of alleged behavioural problems. The boy, who can only be referred to as "P" for legal reasons, was hoping to compel teachers to teach him in normal lessons. He is currently being taught on a one-to-one basis after being expelled from school, a decision which the school governors later revoked.

The High Courts have ruled in favour of a teaching union in the case of a pupil who was refused lessons at school because of alleged behavioural problems. The boy, who can only be referred to as "P" for legal reasons, was hoping to compel teachers to teach him in normal lessons. He is currently being taught on a one-to-one basis after being expelled from school, a decision which the school governors later revoked.

Mr Justice Morison ruled that the school's action was not unlawful, despite lawyers' claims that it was not related to the teachers' terms and conditions of employment. He added that it was a tragedy that the boy's educational problems should have reached the courts.

It is alleged that the boy threatened teachers at the Bonus Pastor School in Lewisham, south London, and assaulted other pupils. The boy denies the allegations.

The National Association of Schoolmasters Union of Women Teachers, which represents the two supply teachers currently educating boy "P" in isolation from other pupils, made no application for legal costs against him. The judge insisted that no evidence was heard regarding the boy's behaviour, and that the decision merely reflected the legality of the union's decision to educate the boy separately.



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