Open Eye: Your complete guide to Open University broadcasts and other Learning Zone programmes on BBC2

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Friday 2 April

00:30 Open Advice: The Three Degrees (FOA095/17)

So, you've got a first degree, what's next - A PhD, an MA or MSc? Students share their experiences of doing a higher degree.

01:00 Shooting Video History (DA301/1)

Get more out of your video camera by using it to record the life and times of your family or community.

01:50 Open Late: Health & Social Welfare (OP.LATE/4)

A closer look at studying Health & Social Welfare at the OU.

05:45 Our Health in Our Hands (K258/1)

How some energetic individuals have widened ways of thinking about health in their communities.

06:10 Immigration, Prejudice and Ethnicity (D103/4)

How do the immigrants of the 1960s and their families feel about life in the UK?

Monday 5 April

05:45 English, English Everywhere (U210/08)

More than a billion people around the world now speak English, but at what cost to the language itself?

06:10 The Qualification Chase (EU208/25)

When it comes to exams, why do academic subjects seem to have a higher status than vocational qualifications?

Tuesday 6 April

00:30 Was Anybody There? (A103/17)

Tables shook, people levitated and seances were all the rage in Victorian society. Surely mediums couldn't trick rational men of science?

01:00 Left and Write: Recalling the 30s (A319/5)

Writers Julian Symons, Stephen Spender and Naomi Mitchison recall the issues that mattered to them in the 1930s.

01:30 Venice & Antwerp: The Cities Compared (A205/5)

Comparing two cities which were both at the peak of prosperity and influence during the 16th century.

05:45 Following a Score (A214/4)

How to follow a musical score.

06:10 Duccio: The Rucellai Madonna (A354/1)

Why Duccio's magnificent 14th century altar-piece continues to fascinate art historians.

06:35 Open Advice: Science Skills (FOA094/16)

What makes studying science different? Past and present OU students reveal all.

Wednesday 7 April

00:30 Asthma and the Bean (MU120/3)

How were statistics used to find the cause of mysterious outbreaks of asthma in Barcelona in the 1980s?

00:55 CyberArt - Technosphere (CYBER/2)

Digital Art on the Web.

01:00 The Front Desk (M206/3)

How to make the interface between computers and people more effective and welcoming.

01:30 Just Seventeen: The Geometry of Patterns (M336/1)

There may seem to be limitless patterns on wallpaper but mathematically speaking there are only seventeen.

05:45 Hidden Power (T203/3)

When electricity supply cables are put underground, how do the

materials differ from those used in pylons?

06:10 Modelling a Muddle (T247/3)

Looking beyond the well-known problems of the European Union's fishing policy to a possible solution.

06:35 Free Body Diagrams (T235/2)

How can diagrams help to predict the drag factor on a car?

23:20 The Battle for Congress

The first programme in a two-part fly-on-the-wall documentary which lifts the lid on the back-room strategies and spins used by two candidates in their hotly contested race for a seat in Congress in California during 1998.

The programme provides an unrivalled insight into American political culture and probes the role of the media in the quest for victory. The Republican candidate plays hardball with a series of personal attacks on his opponent; the Democrat camp counterattacks with a hard-hitting TV ad. The battle has just begun.

To be concluded at the same time next Wednesday. (See also Page 6)

Thursday 8 April

00:30 Food - Whose Choice is it Anyway? (SK220/3)

Four short stories about eating illustrate why food choices can't be taken at face value.

01:00 Healing the Whole (SK220/4)

What's the physiological basis for healing - and what role do our emotions play in the process?

01:30 Whose Views Count? (K258/2)

Health and well-being can mean very different things to different groups - so how do we decide who to listen to?

05:45 Easing the Pain (SD206/3)

A slice of life at a Pain Relief Clinic in Liverpool.

06:10 Pathfinding in the Brain: A Fish & Bird's Eye View (SD206/4)

How do growing nerves find their way to the correct part of the brain?

06:35 Seasonal Affective Disorder (SD206/5)

How sitting under a bright light can help people who get depressed during the dark and dreary days of winter.

Friday 9 April

00:30 A New Sun is Born, Part 1: The Coup (D316/3)

Eye-witness accounts of the popular military coup in 1974 that ended 40 years of dictatorship in Portugal.

01:00 Managing the Common Pool (DT210/1)

How are environmental problems in the North Sea tackled, and by whom?

01:30 Power and Vision: The West and the Rest (D213/2)

An investigation of how Europeans have regarded other cultures through the centuries.

05:45 Playing Safe (K301/)

Children need to play, have exercise and fun, yet sadly childhood accidents are all too common. How can they be prevented?

06:10 Living with Drought (U206/3)

Investigating what African people themselves are doing to solve the environmental crisis that many parts of the continent are facing.

Saturday 10 April

06:10 The Emergence of Greek Mathematics (MA290/1)

Euclid's Elements was written over 2,000 years ago. Why has it been such a revered maths textbook ever since?

06:35 The Third Revolution (B752/2)

Exploring the impact of IT on people's working lives.

07:00 England's Green and Pleasant Land (D318/3)

Visiting the Lake District, Stourhead Gardens, Lacock Abbey and Kelmscott to see how images of England and Englishness have developed.

07:30 The British Family: Sources and Myths (A103/8)

From a Roman tombstone to a 20th century movie, how valuable is historical evidence in the study of the family?

09:00 open.saturday

The Book Is Dead

Howard Stableford finds out how computer technology has changed the way the written word is received, read, stored and used. He asks if the world is facing as big a revolution as it did when the printing press was invented and investigates the implications for the future of books - will they become more or less important? Further details: Ceefax page 626, or on the Internet at: http://www.open.ac.uk/Saturday Brochure Hotline: 0870 900 0303

Sunday 11 April

06:10 Swedish Science in the 18th century (AS283/6)

How Sweden moved from scientific backwater to a nation at the forefront of scientific discovery.

06:35 Spanning Materials (T203/7)

From Berwick upon Tweed to Newcastle and the Humber, how technical advances have changed the design of our bridges.

07:00 The Chemistry of Power (ST240/5)

Exploring the double-edged relationship between chemical knowledge and military, commercial and political power.

07:25 CyberArt - Technosphere

Exploring the digital ecology of a virtual world.

07:30 Personal Passions

Peter Curran gets some lessons in photography from Lord Healey, who shows photos taken during his forty years as a leading politician.

07:45 The Business Cafe

Sheffield United Football Club has a unique regeneration partnership with the local community and Sheffield Council.

This week, presenter Winifred Robinson finds out how the different cultures of private, public and voluntary sectors meet in The Sharrow Partnership to produce a winning team.

Also in the programme, share a cab with Martin Sorrell of advertising agency WPP, who describes how he turned the company's fortunes around, and in An Office of My Own, Peter Coe of the East London and City Health Authority inspires his staff to tackle some of the worst health problems in the UK. Producer: Grant Keir Further details: The Business Cafe Hotline 01908 655603, Ceefax page 627, or website http://www.open.ac.uk/businesscafe

Monday 12 April

05:45 No Place to Hide (U206/5)

Assessing the cost of restoring parts of Ontario to their former glory after years of mineral extraction left them barren.

06:10 Desertification: A Threat to Peace? (DT210/3)

Farmers from the drylands of Kenya show the problems of living on the physical and economic margins of existence.

06:35 Hubbard Brook: The Chemistry of a Forest (S328/5)

A forest in America is providing ecologists with a unique record of how local and global environmental changes affect a complete ecosystem.

Tuesday 13 April

00:30 Building the Perfect Beast (A210/1)

Frankenstein - how and why do Mary Shelley's creations continue to exert such power over our collective imaginations?

01:20 Open Late: Science (OP.LATE/1)

A closer look at studying Science at the OU.

01:30 Women and Allegory: Gender and Sculpture (A216/3)

Allegorical images of women abound in eastern and western cultures. What can we learn by comparing their form and meanings?

05:45 Venice & Antwerp: Forms of Religion (A205/6)

Catholicism, Protestantism, Greek Orthodoxy and Judaism in the 16thcentury cities.

06:10 The Portuguese Voyages of Discovery (AS283/3)

Round-the-world yachtsman, Robin Knox-Johnston, finds out what life was like for the crew for a 15th century sailing ship.

06:35 Open Advice - The Three Degrees (FOA095/17)

So, you've got a first degree, what's next? A PhD, an MA or MSc? Students share their experiences of doing a higher degree.

Wednesday 14 April

00:30 Open Advice: Surviving The Exam (FOA923/11)

A student discovers how the OU's examination system works, and shares some advice on how to prepare yourself.

01:00 A Robot in the Parlour? (T395/2)

Robots get everywhere and can do anything these days - a look at one that can even milk a cow!

01:30 Engineering Materials: Hidden Power (T203/3)

When electricity supply cables are put underground, how do the materials differ from those used in pylons?

05:45 History of Maths: The Vernacular Tradition (MA290/2)

In the Middle Ages, Hindu-Arabic numerals spread to Europe, making new calculation methods available to merchants and businessmen.

06:10 Tilings at the Alhambra (MT365/2)

A mathematical look at the patterns on the tiles that decorate the Alhambra palace in Spain.

06:35 Out of the Blue? (M246/2)

Looking at the statistical chances of being hit by a Doodlebug in World War II or getting ear-ache in the sea.

23:20 The Battle for Congress

Concluding this two part fly-on-the-wall documentary about the 1998 California race for Congress. The cameras follow the ebb and flow of battle right up to election night.

Thursday 15 April

00:30 The Chemistry of Survival (ST240/4)

A look at the art of staying alive, with a chemical slant.

01:00 The Chemistry of Power (ST240/5)

Exploring the double-edged relationship between chemical knowledge and military, commercial and political power.

01:30 The Chemistry of Life and Death (ST240/6)

A quirky exploration of the role of chemistry in our lives - and after.

05:45 Why Do Peacocks have Elaborate Trains? (S365/2)

Research at Whipsnade Zoo and in Rajasthan provokes questions and provides answers about the way peahens choose their mate.

06:10 Sexual Selection and Speciation (S365/10)

How do new biological species form? One answer is provided by research

on Hawaiian flies - the picture wings.

06:35 Horses for Courses: An Evolutionary Radiation (S365/5)

The story of the horse from 50 million years ago to the present time.

Friday 16 April

00:30 The Care Industry (D319/2)

Comparing British and German approaches to the provision of long term care.

01:00 Whose Body? (D318/4)

How is personal identity treated when TV discusses fertility issues and motherhood?

01:30 Talking about Care (K100/1)

Charting the changes in the British care system over the past fifty years, through the experiences of those directly involved.

05:45 A New Sun is Born, Part 2: The Revolution (D316/03A)

Democracy hung in the balance as society was transformed and power was contested after Portugal's "Carnation Revolution" of 1974.

06:10 One Fact, Many Facets (K260/1)

Death comes to us all but the way people come to terms with that stark fact varies tremendously across cultures.

06:35 Our Health in Our Hands (K258/1)

How some energetic individuals have widened ways of thinking about health in their communities.

Saturday 17 April

06:10 Bangkok: A City Speaks (U206/4)

A look at the environmental cost of Bangkok's drive for economic success.

06:35 Bulls, Bears and China Shops (B752/3)

How has Marks & Spencer adapted to the demands of marketing their products in Hong Kong?

07:00 Women of Northern Ireland (D218/1)

The women living in this troubled country reveal their hopes and fears for peace and equality.

07:30 The French Revolution: Impact and Sources (A103/9)

Historical evidence helps paint a vivid picture of events leading up to, during and after the Revolution.

09:00 open.saturday

Mind Bending

Howard Stableford looks at how company bosses are increasingly recognising that the brainpower of their workforce is an important business asset. But who will be the winners and losers in this brave new world? With 'mind- map' pioneer Tony Buzan and industry expert Charles Handy. Further details: Ceefax 626, or on the Internet at:

http://www.open.ac.uk/saturday. Brochure Hotline: 0870-900 0303

Sunday 18 April

06:10 Oceanography: Understanding the Oceans (S330/0)

How understanding the oceans and their interaction with the atmosphere may be crucial to our survival on earth.

07:00 Cine Cinephiles (L210/1)

French cinema - an art form which is now over 100 years old.

07:25 CyberArt: In Conversation

Using surveillance cameras and the net, passers by in a busy street can chat to web surfers across the world.

07:30 Personal Passions: Patsy Byrne

Peter Curran goes in search of the private passions behind the public life of Patsy Byrne, 'Nursey' in the Blackadder series, who reveals an interest in genealogy.

07:45 The Business Cafe

Further details: The Business Cafe Hotline 01908-655603,

Ceefax page 627 or website: http://www.open.ac.uk/businesscafe

Monday 19 April

05:45 Learning to Care (E242/2)

How one Scottish local authority set about improving childcare provision.

06:10 English Only in America? (U210/3)

With the growing number of Spanish speakers in the USA, some Americans want the English language written into the Constitution.

06:35 A School for our Times? (EU208/21)

The ethos and life of a successful infant school near Reading.

Tuesday 20 April

00:30 Composing: George Fenton in Conversation (A214/3)

This composer, who links such films as Gandhi, Memphis Belle and Dangerous Liaisons, talks about the business of writing music.

01:00 Writing and Publishing: In the Market Place (A319/7)

Jeanette Winterson, author of Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit, talks about the commercial aspects of writing and publishing literature.

01:30 Church and Mosque: Venice and Istanbul (A216/2)

Exploring the differences and similarities between two great religious buildings, built at the same time for different, but neighbouring, cultures.

05:45 The Chosen People (PH722/1)

Who is a Jew - and how consistent is the Jewish identity?

06:10 Classical Sculpture and the Enlightenment (A206/5)

Charles Townley's collection in the British museum illustrates the 18th century fascination with classical taste.

06:35 The Bathers by Cezanne and Renoir (A316/7)

Comparing the approaches of Cezanne and Renoir to painting the nude.

Wednesday 21 April

00:30 Caught in Time (MU120/5)

How mathematicians have discovered previously unknown juggling patterns.

01:00 Soaring Achievements (MST207/2)

Following a glider race above the French countryside to discover the mathematics behind unpowered flight.

01:30 Transforming the World (M203/LA4)

What do graphics for the newsroom, kitchen design and RAF cockpit research have in common?

05:45 'New Generations' and 'Piping Hot' (T102/503)

In the last ten years, methods of making electricity have changed dramatically - how will this affect UK energy policy?

06:35 Of Fish and People: Modelling a Muddle (T247/3)

Looking beyond the well-known problems of the European Union's fishing policy to a possible solution.

Thursday 22 April

00:30 Sickle Cell: A Lethal Advantage (S103/4)

Why this potentially lethal inherited condition is so common amongst people of African origin.

01:00 The KT Event (S269/7)

Investigating the theory that a huge meteor collided with Earth 60m years ago, killing off the dinosaurs.

01:30 The Nature of Impacts and Their Impacts on Nature (S269/9)

How scientists know if craters on the Earth's surface were caused by crash landing rocks from space.

05:45 Nerves (S203/10)

Looking at our understanding of how nerves work and how it can be used to help treat nervous diseases.

06:10 Insect Hormones (S203/11)

The life-cycle of the tobacco hornworm, to see how its develop-ment is controlled.

06:35 Regulation and Control (S203/20)

A cow grazes all day long, but a leopard feeds only once. What decides food and water intake in different species?

Friday 23 April

00:30 Pacific Studies: Patrolling the American Lake (DD302/2)

The US Navy and Airforce have a huge presence in the post-Cold War Pacific. What are they doing there?

01:00 Just in Time? Restructuring Corporate America (D214/5)

How three major US companies are facing up to the economic challenges of the '90s.

01:50 Open Late: Social Sciences

A closer look at studying Social Sciences at the OU.

05:45 Global Tourism (D215/4)

A look at the growth of global tourism and the social and cultural problems that it creates.

06:10 Women, Children and Work (D103/05)

What are the costs of providing child care and who should foot the bill?

Saturday 24 April

06:05 No Place to Hide (U206/5)

Assessing the cost of restoring parts of Ontario to their former glory after years of mineral extraction left them barren.

06:30 Whose Body? (D318/4)

How is personal identity treated when TV discusses fertility issues and motherhood?

07:00 Talking about Care (K100/1)

Charting the changes in the British care system over the past fifty years, through the experiences of those directly involved.

07:30 Rousseau in Africa: Democracy in the Making (A103/10)

Finding out how recent events in South Africa reflect philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau's theories on human nature.

09:00 open.saturday

A Sense of Identity

What sets each of us apart as individuals - from gender and ethnic origin to appearance and past experiences - and why we express ourselves in such different ways. Comedian Morwenna Banks who has found fame impersonating a little girl in shows such as Absolutely and Saturday Night Live talks to David Goldblatt.

Adeline Yen Mah explains how her troubled childhood in China inspired her best selling book Falling Leaves.

Further details: Ceefax page 626, or http://www.open.ac.uk/saturday Brochure Hotline: 0870 900 0303

Sunday 25 April

06:05 The Care Industry (D319/2)

British and German approaches to the provision of long-term care.

06:35 Classical Sculpture and the Enlightenment (A206/5)

Charles Townley's collection in the British museum illustrates the 18th century fascination with classical taste.

07:00 Open Advice: Women in Science and Technology (FOA094/15)

More women than ever are turning to these areas for rewarding study and careers. Meet Bev the ecologist, Caroline the dietician and Kim the civil engineer.

07:25 CyberArt: Sub-Merge

How a Liverpool nightclub used electronic art to create the ultimate club experience.

07:30 Personal Passions

Peter Curran meets Dr Dick Stephen, a leading physiologist, who takes time out to share his passion for making mechanical clocks.

07:45 The Business Cafe

Further details: The Business Cafe Hotline 01908 65 Ceefax page 627 or http://www.open.ac.uk/businesscafe

Monday 26 April

05:45 Informer, duquer, Divertir? (L210/2)

How politics and commerce have shaped broadcasting in France.

06:10 A Lesson in Progress? (EU208/22)

Looking at French and English Primary education systems.

06:35 English Only in America? (U210/3)

With the growing number of Spanish speakers in the USA, some Americans want the use of English written into the Constitution.

Tuesday 27 April

00:30 Changes in Rural Society: Piedmont and Sicily (A221/4)

How these two very different rural societies, which became part of a united Italy, evolved during the 19th century.

01:30 Venice & Antwerp: Forms of Religion (A205/6)

Exploring the role of Catholicism, Protestantism, Greek Orthodoxy and Judaism in 16th century cities.

05:45 The Thrie Estaites (A205/7)

Sparks fly in Sir David Lindsay's play, as the common people battle for justice in 16th century Scotland.

06:10 Angelica Kauffman, RA (A206/6)

This Swiss woman painter overcame the restrictions of her time to become a founder member of Britain's Royal Academy.

06:35 The Colonial Encounter (A316/8)

How African art was displayed at the Paris World Fair in 1900 and has been shown in museums since then.

Wednesday 28 April

00:30 Empowerment (T245/1)

How much power we have in the workplace, how much we ought to have and how managements control us.

01:00 Living with Cracks (T353/3)

How can the strength of a cracked body be predicted?

01:30 Inspection by Torchlight (T203/4)

Examining a priceless painting from the V&A to explore the nature of colour and light.

05:45 Marin Mersenne: The Birth of Modern Geometry (MA290/3)

How a French monk laid the foundations of a scientific community stretching across Europe during the 17th century.

06:10 Development Aid (MDST242/2)

Seeing how agencies like UNICEF use statistics to plan long term development projects to improve child health worldwide.

06:35 Money Grows on Trees (MT365/5)

How the route of pipelines bringing North Sea gas ashore is determined by technology and maths.

Thursday 29 April

00:30 Seal Secrets (S324/16)

A look at the physiology behind the diving abilities and feeding habits of grey, common and elephant seals.

01:00 Walking and Running (S324/6)

A close look at legs - human, animal and robot.

01:30 Swimming in Fish: An Experimental Approach (S324/8)

With the aid of an underwater flashing light and food rewards, fish show their muscle power.

05:45 The Great Iron and Steel Rollercoaster (S268/1)

The history of the British steel industry from 1066 to the present day.

06:10 Rocks for Roads (S268/3)

More cars mean more roads, but what's the cost to the environment?

Friday 30 April

00:30 Insights into Violence (D317/2)

From playground punch-up to wartime brutality, it seems violent behaviour is always with us - but what prompts it?

01:00 Which Body? (D318/5)

What image of themselves do people have in mind when they take exercise?

01:30 The Psychology of Addiction (DSE202/3)

Exploring the work of Merseyside's drug dependency clinics.

05:45 Action against Missiles (D213/9)

Members of the protest against siting Cruise missiles in the UK reflect on their experience of taking direct action.

06:10 Out of the Melting Pot (D214/9)

Like many ethnic communities in the USA, Jewish Americans are rediscovering their cultural roots. But does being more Jewish mean being less American?

Saturday 1 May

06:10 'New Generations' and 'Piping Hot' (T102/503)

In the last ten years, methods of making electricity have changed dramatically - how will this affect UK energy policy?

07:00 Patrolling the American Lake (DD302/2)

The US Navy and Airforce have a huge presence in the post-Cold War Pacific. What are they doing there?

07:30 Waiting Their Turn: Minorities in a Democracy (A103/11)

What options are available to people who feel their views aren't represented in parliament?

Sunday 2 May

06:05 Myth and Music (A103/22)

Composer Judith Weir explains why she wrote a series of works based on Scottish folktales about people who have disappeared mysteriously.

06:35 Angelica Kauffman, RA (A206/6)

This Swiss woman painter overcame the restrictions of her time to become a founder member of Britain's Royal Academy.

07:00 I Used to Work in the Fields (U208/6)

Malaysia has joined other South East Asian countries in trying systematic industrialisation, but what's the effect on the people?

Mon 3 May

05:45 Learning to Care (E242/2)

How one Scottish local authority set about improving childcare provision for pre-school children.

06:10 A Lesson in Progress? (EU208/22)

Looking at French and English Primary education systems.

06:35 Breaking Out (U208/8)

Many women fought in Zimbabwe's war of independence, hoping that their lives would improve. Were their ambitions realised?

Tue 4 May

00:30 This True Book of Ours: The Human Body (AS283/2)

How Leonardo da Vinci and Andreas Vesalius contributed to the origins of modern anatomy.

01:00 "The Island": An Historic Piece? (A319/6)

In 1973 three South Africans devised one of the most powerful plays ever produced about imprisonment and resistance - The Island.

01:30 The Thrie Estaites (A205/7)

Sparks fly in Sir David Lindsay's play, as the common people battle for justice in 16th century Scotland.

05:45 Discovering 16th Century Strasbourg (A205/8)

An architectural amble through Strasbourg's streets reveals much of the city's "golden age".

06:10 Kedleston Hall (A206/7)

Exploring Robert Adam's architectural masterpiece.

06:35 Picasso's Collages 1912-13 (A316/9)

Two contrasting explanations of Picasso's controversial works, completed on the eve of the First World War.

Wednesday 5 May

00:30 Blue Haven (MST121/2)

Can mathematical models help to decide whether the Blue Whale will survive, or is it already too late?

01:00 The Information Society (M206/4)

The Britannia Building Society's new customer information system provides an object lesson in how to treat the public.

01:30 Money Grows on Trees (MT365/5)

Finding out how the route taken by the pipelines bringing North Sea gas ashore is determined by technology and maths.

05:45 Inspection by Torchlight (T203/4)

Examining a priceless painting from the V&A to explore the nature of colour and light.

06:10 Velocity Diagrams (T235/3)

How diagrams showing a component's speed can help to solve engineering problems.

06:35 Computers in Conversation (THD204/3)

How the convergence of computers and telephones might change the way people communicate

Thursday 6 May

00:30 Did Tibet Cool the Earth? (S269/3)

Scientists investigate the controversy linking the rise of the Tibetan plateau with changes in the Earth's climate.

01:00 Volcanoes and the Atmosphere (S269/6)

Evidence that volcanic eruptions can change the Earth's climate, and could even have contributed to the death of the dinosaurs.

01:30 Biosphere 2 (S269/2)

Following the attempt to create a mini-Earth inside a massive glass bubble in the Arizona Desert.

05:45 Is Seeing Believing? (S203/4)

A look at the problems that can arise when examining a cell under a microscope.

06:10 Organelles and Origins (S203/7)

A blend of biology and chemistry in this look at the workings of plant cells.

06:35 Enzymes: Thoroughbred Workhorses of the Cell (S203/6)

How do these complex molecules control the chemistry of life with such precision and efficiency?

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