Ashridge has launched a management course that acknowledges earlier learning

Ashridge Business School launched its Masters in management programme in April 2010 with the aim of providing an opportunity for its students to transform executive learning time into a recognised postgraduate qualification.

A Masters in management qualification isn't a new idea, but Roger Delves, director of Ashridge's programme, claims this version has been designed to respond to the changing needs of people at work.

"There's a growing interest among managers to add to their professional credibility and prospects by having a degree standard qualification," he explains. "But often they don't have the opportunity to take off a year to do a [full-time] MBA or [two-years for an] executive MBA. The attraction of the Ashridge programme is that it's mainly virtual, which allows people to study in their own space at their own time, but is a Masters level degree from a well-respected institution."

Delves says the programme is designed for our current business climate. "Much of the content addresses the need to lead in adversity and ambiguity. The changing international environment means there is a generation of managers who haven't managed in difficult economic times and need to learn how to do so quickly."

The programme is delivered in three stages, awarding a certificate, then a diploma and finally the Masters in management. Students attend Ashridge for five days during the first stage, although any open or tailored programmes they've completed there within the past five years can be credited towards these requirements. The total programme takes two years, but can be taken in three stages.

This combination of virtual learning and face-to-face experience is unusual, says Delves. "This is an interesting innovation. It's the first time that people who have done tailored executive education can credit that time against a qualification programme."

Distance learning has been on the scene for over a decade, but Delves argues people are increasingly accustomed to working with virtual material. "We decided to offer a media learning zone where they can choose to learn in a variety of different ways. The technology needs to be reasonably simple and robust, because students are based globally. We use PowerPoint with voice-overs, offer online synchronised tutorials for discussions and encourage learning support groups so no-one has to learn on their own."

Rather than issuing large expensive book lists, the programme provides hyperlinks to articles containing core academic thinking. Delves defends the scheme against accusations of being "lite" education. "From online discussions and feedback from tutorials we find our students are offering challenging questions and producing quality assignments."

To date around 30 students have signed up, with a three figure target by the end of next year. Ages range from 30 to 50 years old, with the majority from outside the UK. Delves says the fees are very competitive.

"The total programme costs £16,000, but students can do the first level then take a year out to save for the next stage. Employers have shown their support by sponsoring individuals and small groups, while some are considering it as part of their redundancy package."

Management development has moved away from purely academic learning to mixing theory with practical experience. Delves says: "We decided to assess by assignments rather than exams. All the learning is geared towards helping students to undertake assignments and they have to do a piece of internal consultancy inside their own organisation. This creates a virtuous circle where all the learning feeds straight back into practical workplace environments and use."

For the students who are based overseas, Ashridge is prepared to take the face-to-face learning to them.

"If there are a number of individuals in one area our faculty can go and deliver on the spot, or managers can attend open portfolio programmes that we offer in different parts of the world," says Delves.

"Wherever you are, Ashridge is creating an environment where you don't have to travel to the UK to get a UK Masters in management degree."

‘I LIKE THE PRAGMATIC APPROACH TO THE PROGRAMME’

Stephanie Roux is director of a Paris-based management consultancy who started on the Ashridge Masters in management programme in April 2010. Why did she choose Ashridge rather than programmes offered in France?

“The French style of management is very different to the English – here we still have formal talks to deal with an issue, but I like the Anglo-Saxon approach, explains Roux.

A British client with international branches had recommended Ashridge to Roux, and in 2008 she went to a short face-to-face programme on leadership skills at the management college.

“I thoroughly enjoyed it, and decided to do something that would give me a diploma.

“An MBA was too large and would take up too much time. I’d been to business school 20 years ago when I was 21, and this time I wanted to focus on my special subject, which is change leadership.

“The Ashridge programme spends a third of the year on this area, and also includes strategy and finance, so the offer was exactly what I wanted at this stage in my career.”

The flexibility of the programme means that Roux can fit studying round her job. “I spend the equivalent of two days a week on it in the evening and weekends. My tutor agreed that I could do a project on one of my clients for the practical learning assignment. I’ve been able to interview clients and try and understand their particular problem without having a consultant’s hat on.

“I like the pragmatic approach of the programme – there’s a lot of hype written about leadership, but the reality is very different, and that’s what the Ashridge programme gives you.

“It’s years since I was at business school, and though I’m proficient in change I needed to be updated in other areas of management. Doing the Masters in management is a valuable experience for the next step in my career, as a consultant with a broader outlook on business.”

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
News
Leah Devine is only the ninth female to have made the Young Magician of the Year final since the contest began more than 50 years
peopleMeet the 16-year-old who has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year
News
Jonathan Anderson was born in Northern Ireland but now based between London, where he presents a line named JW Anderson
peopleBritish designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
News
Andy Davidhazy at the beginning (left) and end (right) of his hike
video
News
Taylor Swift is applying to trademark song lyrics from 1989
people
Voices
The popularity of TV shows such as The Liver Birds encouraged Liverpudlians to exaggerate their Scouse accent
voicesWe exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Education

Imperial College London: Safety Training Administrator

£25,880 – £28,610 per annum: Imperial College London: Imperial College London ...

University College London: Client Platform Support Officer

£26,976 - £31,614 per annum: University College London: UCL Information Servic...

Guru Careers: Instructional Designer / e-Learning Designer

£30 - 32k (DOE): Guru Careers: We are seeking an Instructional / e-Learning De...

Recruitment Genius: Schools Education & Careers Executive

£30500 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Schools Education & Careers Executive ...

Day In a Page

Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor
How to make your own Easter egg: Willie Harcourt-Cooze shares his chocolate recipes

How to make your own Easter egg

Willie Harcourt-Cooze talks about his love affair with 'cacao' - and creates an Easter egg especially for The Independent on Sunday
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef declares barbecue season open with his twist on a tradtional Easter Sunday lamb lunch

Bill Granger's twist on Easter Sunday lunch

Next weekend, our chef plans to return to his Aussie roots by firing up the barbecue
Joe Marler: 'It's the way I think the game should be played'

Joe Marler: 'It's the way I think the game should be played'

The England prop relives the highs and lows of last Saturday's remarkable afternoon of Six Nations rugby
Cricket World Cup 2015: Has the success of the tournament spelt the end for Test matches?

Cricket World Cup 2015

Has the success of the tournament spelt the end for Test matches?
The Last Word: Justin Gatlin knows the price of everything, the value of nothing

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Justin Gatlin knows the price of everything, the value of nothing