FOCUS: WAR IN EUROPE: A WEEK OF CONFLICT

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The Independent Online
SUNDAY 2 MAY

The US civil rights leader, the Rev Jesse Jackson, leads the three captured American soldiers to freedom. Diplomatic activity increases amid mixed signals from Belgrade on President Milosevic's readiness to accept an armed peacekeeping presence in Kosovo.

MONDAY 3 MAY

Tony Blair visits refugee camps in Macedonia. He announces a doubling of financial aid to the region - to around pounds 40m - and promises that Britain will accept more refugees. Russia's mediator, Victor Chernomyrdin, flies to Washington for talks.

TUESDAY 4 MAY

Nato's senior military official, General Klaus Naumann, concedes that the alliance has failed in its initial war aims. The Home Secretary, Jack Straw, announces that Britain could soon be accepting up to 1,000 refugees a week.

WEDNESDAY 5 MAY

At the USAF base in Spangdahlem, southern Germany, President Clinton describes the Nato campaign as "a fight for the future of Europe". Diplomatic manoeuvres intensify. Two American servicemen die as a second Apache helicopter crashes in a training accident.

THURSDAY 6 MAY

Serbia appears totally isolated as Russia agrees to a peace formula at the G8 meeting in Bonn, backed by a UN-mandated multinational force. The agreed principles of the G8 nations could pave the way for a UN resolution condemning Yugoslavia.

FRIDAY 7 MAY

Just as diplomatic efforts appeared to be succeeding, Nato launches a devastating strike on Nis, Yugoslavia's third largest city. Authorities claim 11 people were killed and 60 injured. The strike comes after President Milosevic signals he is ready to accept the rough outline of the G8 peace plan.

SATURDAY 8 MAY

Nato hits the Chinese embassy in Belgrade. China, Russia and Yugoslavia describe it as a "barbaric act". The UN Security Council meets in emergency session. Mr Chernomyrdin flies to Europe for more talks.

CHRIS BROWN

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