How elk antlers make men horny

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The Independent Online
CANADIAN sportsmen given an extract from elk antlers as part of a fitness supplement trial are reporting significantly increased prowess - but not on the football pitch.

The girlfriends of members of Alberta University's Golden Bear American football team are demanding their men be given even more pills after discovering their enhanced physical performance continued well into the night.

Scientists at the University of Alberta stumbled across the new aphrodisiac quite accidentally. They now believe they have found a natural alternative to Viagra.

"The sportsmen experienced considerably improved erectile function that diminished when they were taken off the substance," said a spokesman.

"You need very good blood flow for good erectile function," he helpfully added.

But what's good in the bedroom isn't necessarily as useful on the football pitch. The players found their testosterone levels boosted to such heights that they had to stop taking the pills for fear of becoming too aggressive.

The Alberta project, led by Brian Fisher, Professor of Sports Medicine, could threaten the world dominance of Viagra, Pfizer's anti-impotence drug, which last week was rationed on the NHS to one pill a week for a limited number of men.

The drug company is believed to be monitoring the project's progress.

The university has now begun a more detailed research project into the potential of elk antler velvet (the fur on the antlers) for treating impotence. They want to run more tests into increases in hormone levels, oxygen absorption and blood flow.

The researchers believe that the velvet benefits oxygen absorption and blood flow but they need to be sure that the raised hormone levels will not have long-term side effects.

"Whenever you elevate something, when you throw off mother nature, you may be setting up for some other problems down the road," said Professor Fisher.

Elk are commonly found in North America and are not an endangered species. Their antlers can be harvested each year by removing them using a local anaesthetic.

But wildlife campaigners fear that the discovery could lead to an increase in poaching by desperate men.

"Our concern is that people could go around shooting elk for personal and financial gain," said a spokesman for the League Against Cruel Sports.

"We are sure people can have a vigorous life without the need to resort to killing animals."

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