Bucking trends before breakfast

Scotland's newest paper insists it has a unique selling point.

Final details are now emerging of Scotland's first new daily newspaper for more than 100 years - a small circulation business paper which threatens to overturn several immutable truths about the Scottish and, potentially, British market - is nearing publication.

Final details are now emerging of Scotland's first new daily newspaper for more than 100 years - a small circulation business paper which threatens to overturn several immutable truths about the Scottish and, potentially, British market - is nearing publication.

Business a.m, a paper targeted entirely at a business and finance audience, is being launched by the Swedish newspaper group Bonnier AG in five or six weeks. It has modest aspirations, to sell only 35,000 copies in four years' time. But the paper is entering probably the most competitive newspaper market in the world and is planning to sell most of its copies by subscription, arriving before breakfast with the morning mail.

Given the state of the Royal Mail, that alone is a tough task. Through its new subsidiary, Business Media Scotland, Bonnier also plans to buck other traditions in the British industry - in particular by printing the paper by using a European-style, slightly rectangular tabloid format that is slightly bigger than traditional red-tops, but smaller than the broadsheets. It will be designed by Ally Palmer, the designer of Sunday Business and the later versions of The European, and will be Scandinavian in feel.

Rather than text-heavy news stories, said John Penman, the paper's editor, the front page will also offer the more digestible, bite-sized stories offered by its north European counterparts, with the front page effectively a menu for the paper's contents.

Speaking as he held "a dummy in my hands, hot off the presses," Mr Penman said: "The way we present the front page will be very different from UK papers. One of the guiding principles of this paper is that we're not eating into your time.

"We're not going to make it difficult for you to get information and therefore the menu approach in principle is good. It's how you make it work and in touch with what our British readers expect."That design has, however, introduced other problems for the designers. "There has to be a broadsheets approach for images, which is a challenge for snappers and a challenge for designers, but I think we've pulled it off."

Penman's initial subscription target is roughly 30 per cent of its early sales, growing to 75 per cent in about 2004. Advertisers have been told to plan their buying for Monday October 9 _ a day close to Penman's closely-guarded launch date.

However, Business am's critics have already alleged the paper is simply a rehash of projects which were rejected as unworkable by the Daily Record, which employed Penman to devise a similar Scottish project, then known as Project X, and Scottish Media Group, publishers of The Herald.

But Penman insists its "unique selling point" is its deliberate targeting. Devised for a market with four major city-based dailies, such as The Herald and The Scotsman, alongside all the London papers, Business a.m hopes it can plug a small but lucrative gap. It will also establish another tradition for Scots: it never publishes on Saturday.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Arts and Entertainment
Supporting role: at the Supreme Court, Rhodes was accompanied by a famous friend, the actor Benedict Cumberbatch
booksPianist James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to stop the injunction of his memoirs
Arts and Entertainment
Jesuthasan Antonythasan as Dheepan
filmDheepan, film review
Sport
Steven Gerrard scores for Liverpool
sport
News
peopleComedian star of Ed Sullivan Show was mother to Ben Stiller
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

Guru Careers: Senior Account Manager / SAM

£30 - 35k: Guru Careers: A Senior Account Manager / SAM is needed to join the ...

Ashdown Group: Digital Marketing Manager (EMEA) - City, London

£55000 - £65000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Digital Marketing Manager...

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?