Media: Creative impulse

As the office-party season falls upon us, Fuji has mounted a poster campaign to acquaint revellers with their QuickSnap disposable camera. The three executions show people's faces distorted with embarrassment as they are shown compromising photos taken with a QuickSnap, and promotes the product not only as "easy to carry" and "easy to use", but also "easy to destroy a promising career with" or "easy to ruin someone's Christmas with". The campaign represents Simons Palmer Clemmow Johnson's first work for Fuji since winning the pounds 6m account in September.

The client: Fuji Photo Film (UK) Ltd

Janet Hutt, group product manager

The market for single-use cameras is undeveloped in the UK, compared with, say, France, where the number of people using them is quite high. But we've had a camera of this kind for about 10 years now - it was invented in Tokyo by Fujifilm - and we've just launched a new model, which is the one in the new campaign.

We think there's big potential for this market, and so, quite simply, we're trying to grow interest in it. Young people are our target, which is why the approach is so different from normal camera advertising.

The agency: Simons Palmer Clemmow Johnson

Paul Simons, chairman

We felt the best way of educating consumers about this product was to dramatise its use in the run-up to Christmas. Most people wouldn't dream of taking an expensive camera to an office party in case it was damaged or stolen, but often wish they had a camera during the evening. There are two problems in advertising disposable cameras. First, people think they produce poor-quality photos - which they don't - and second, they think they're not proper cameras. But if you tried to tackle these problems rationally, the ad would be very dry and boring. We do make a rational point with the "easy to carry, easy to use" strapline, and say you can use the QuickSnap where you wouldn't take a normal camera.

These events are hard to dramatise, though, and so we went for the compromising picture angle, showing an exaggerated reaction in the aftermath of the party - that "Oh, my God!" reaction that people have when they're shown pictures of themselves being foolish. You're often at a party and think "I wish I had a camera here", but these ads are getting you to think about how you might capture these embarrassing moments before the eventn

Scott Hughes

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