Media: Would you swap it for another type of ad?: Martin Rosenbaum finds many people are happy with the present brand of detergent advertising

Sean O'Brien, a Liverpool fireman, has struck a minor blow for sex equality. After 31 years of commercials in which 'ordinary housewives' have extolled the virtues of Daz, Mr O'Brien has just become the first man to do so. Never mind that Danny Baker and the Daz Doorstep Challenge team were actually hoping to find his wife - she was in the bath when they arrived - Mr O'Brien and his impressively white T-shirt are now on our television screens.

In 1962 a Mrs Emmett from Chippenham told the then equivalent of Danny Baker, a rather more staid gentleman, that Daz produced the whitest wash she'd ever seen. Ever since, most Daz ads have been variations on that theme. With few exceptions, advertising for other detergents has been similarly unimaginative, based on trials, testimonials, product demonstrations, performance and price comparisons, and contrived domestic scenes, usually with stereotypical gender roles.

A time traveller from 30 years ago might be baffled by the range now available - bio, non-bio, powders, liquids, concentrates, refills and colour variants - but would find the way they are advertised reassuringly familiar. The products may claim to be new, improved and revolutionary, but no one could say this of the advertising.

'Advertising in this area hasn't really changed that much in 30 or 40 years,' says David Kingsley, who worked on the Procter & Gamble brands Daz and Tide in the Fifties and Sixties. 'Our advertising was derived from successful P&G campaigns in the United States. It gave individual identities to products. Tide was cleanness, Daz was whiteness. There is no reason to think the testimonial and product comparison ideas have lost validity. Advertising thinks it's an innovative business, but it isn't'

Procter & Gamble (maker of Ariel, Bold, Daz and Fairy) and its rival Lever Brothers (Persil, Radion and Surf), which together dominate the market, have invested vast sums in creating and maintaining brand identities. Last year around pounds 80m was spent on advertising to sell detergents worth around pounds 850m. This sector has consistently had one of the highest advertising-to-sales ratios for mass- market products.

The two companies are fighting an expensive battle for market share, but the extent of their advertising also makes it hard for newcomers to enter the market. The duopoly's critics say these costs result in unnecessarily high prices. Last year the companies narrowly escaped a Monopolies and Mergers Commission inquiry.

Persil and Ariel, each with 25- 30 per cent of the market, are promoted through distinct identities. 'Persil is very much about the family,' says John Heatley, account director at J Walter Thompson, which has advertised the brand for decades. 'The 'Persil Mum' has been around almost since the beginning of the brand's life. Most washing in most households is still done by Mum. Men seem to have a problem with washing machines.'

In contrast, Ariel is presented as an stain remover, while Daz is positioned as a source of whiteness, Radion as an odour-destroyer, Fairy as gentle and caring, and Bold and Surf as value-for-money products.

'When we launched our own brand Novon last year, our research showed that housewives were clear about the positioning of different brands,' says Mike Rosen, director of non-food buying for Sainsbury. 'The ads have been good at communicating brand image for years, but if you are spending tens of millions of pounds the sheer weight of money helps.'

The ads may successfully project brand personalities, but people who work on them are accustomed to criticism rather than praise. 'We are used to getting not very good coverage on detergent advertising,' says Annabelle Manwaring, who has worked on Daz for six years at Leo Burnett. 'We've got thick skins.' The ads are widely derided within the marketing world for being formulaic, sexist and boring.

'Most detergent advertising is patronising and treats people as if they were complete idiots,' says Dan Brooke of Chiat Day Mojo, which produced the distinctive 'recycled commercials' - Fifties footage with a new voice-over - last year for the small environmental brand Ecover. 'Advertisers also play on people's insecurities, by inventing problems such as 'the odours you can't smell'. There have to be more effective ways to spend your money, but P&G and Lever Brothers just don't want to take the risk.'

'Recall of P&G advertising is very strong, but a lot of it is very crass,' says Tony Baines, household buying controller for Tesco. And last year Bernard Barnett, editorial director of the advertising trade magazine Campaign, wrote that if all ads were like P&G's, 'the British public would not tolerate the interruption of its television programmes by commercials'.

Sometimes criticisms come from ordinary consumers who discover that advertising does not always correspond to reality. In the past three years the Independent Television Commission has upheld complaints from irate viewers who found, contrary to claims in commercials, that Ariel Ultra did not always remove fatty stains at 40 C, that Bold Ultra could not be purchased for less than pounds 4.50, and that muddy stains were not necessarily eradicated by one wash with Persil Concentrated.

Amanda Bernstein, Surf account director at Foote, Cone & Belding, says: 'It can be soul-destroying working on washing powder. They're the ads people love to hate. When I came into advertising I thought it was my chance to do something creative and different. But it doesn't work. Housewives are practical animals who want to know if the product works.

'So no criticisms please. There's always a good reason for the way things are.'

(Photographs omitted)

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Recruitment Genius: 3D CAD Designer - Exhibition Stands

£20000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Rapid growth has seen a number ...

Guru Careers: Graduate Software Developer / Junior Developer

£20 - 28k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Graduate Software Develop...

Recruitment Genius: Delegate Telesales Executive - OTE £21,000 uncapped

£16000 - £21000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: High quality, dedicated Delegat...

Guru Careers: Marketing Manager / Marketing Communications Manager

£35-40k (DOE) + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Marketing Communicati...

Day In a Page

Fifa corruption: The 161-page dossier that exposes the organisation's dark heart

The 161-page dossier that exposes Fifa's dark heart

How did a group of corrupt officials turn football’s governing body into what was, in essence, a criminal enterprise? Chris Green and David Connett reveal all
Mediterranean migrant crisis: 'If Europe thinks bombing boats will stop smuggling, it will not. We will defend ourselves,' says Tripoli PM

Exclusive interview with Tripoli PM Khalifa al-Ghweil

'If Europe thinks bombing boats will stop smuggling, it will not. We will defend ourselves'
Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles: How the author foretold the Californian water crisis

Raymond Chandler's Los Angeles

How the author foretold the Californian water crisis
Chinese artist who posted funny image of President Xi Jinping facing five years in prison as authorities crackdown on dissent in the arts

Art attack

Chinese artist who posted funny image of President Xi Jinping facing five years in prison
Marc Jacobs is putting Cher in the limelight as the face of his latest campaign

Cher is the new face of Marc Jacobs

Alexander Fury explains why designers are turning to august stars to front their lines
Parents of six-year-old who beat leukaemia plan to climb Ben Nevis for cancer charity

'I'm climbing Ben Nevis for my daughter'

Karen Attwood's young daughter Yasmin beat cancer. Now her family is about to take on a new challenge - scaling Ben Nevis to help other children
10 best wedding gift ideas

It's that time of year again... 10 best wedding gift ideas

Forget that fancy toaster, we've gone off-list to find memorable gifts that will last a lifetime
Paul Scholes column: With the Premier League over for another year, here are my end of season awards

Paul Scholes column

With the Premier League over for another year, here are my end of season awards
Heysel disaster 30th anniversary: Liverpool have seen too much tragedy to forget fateful day in Belgium

Liverpool have seen too much tragedy to forget Heysel

Thirty years ago, 39 fans waiting to watch a European Cup final died as a result of a fatal cocktail of circumstances. Ian Herbert looks at how a club dealt with this tragedy
Amir Khan vs Chris Algieri: Khan’s audition for Floyd Mayweather may turn into a no-win situation, says Frank Warren

Khan’s audition for Mayweather may turn into a no-win situation

The Bolton fighter could be damned if he dazzles and damned if he doesn’t against Algieri, the man last seen being decked six times by Pacquiao, says Frank Warren
Blundering Tony Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

Blundering Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

For Arabs – and for Britons who lost their loved ones in his shambolic war in Iraq – his appointment was an insult, says Robert Fisk
Fifa corruption arrests: All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue

Fifa corruption arrests

All hail the Feds for riding to football's rescue, says Ian Herbert
Isis in Syria: The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of President Assad and militant fighters

The Kurdish enclave still resisting the tyranny of Assad and Isis

In Syrian Kurdish cantons along the Turkish border, the progressive aims of the 2011 uprising are being enacted despite the war. Patrick Cockburn returns to Amuda
How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields: Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape the US

How I survived Cambodia's Killing Fields

Acclaimed surgeon SreyRam Kuy celebrates her mother's determination to escape to the US
Stephen Mangan interview: From posh buffoon to pregnant dad, the actor has quite a range

How Stephen Mangan got his range

Posh buffoon, hapless writer, pregnant dad - Mangan is certainly a versatile actor