Stephen Glover: Just what kind of agreement do Cameron and Murdoch have?

Has there been a secret deal between David Cameron and Rupert Murdoch?

Stephen Glover: Why Cameron will enjoy a world where the sun always shines

Say what you like about The Sun, once it has declared it will back you it does not renege on the agreement. For years it slavishly supported Tony Blair, enthusiastically endorsing his case for war against Iraq, and underplaying or ignoring the bad news when things began to go wrong after the invasion.

Stephen Glover: £40m sale of family silver may not go far at ‘The Guardian’

The Guardian may now be housed in fancy offices near Kings Cross, complete with their own theatre, but its spiritual home is Manchester. There, some hundred years after it was founded in 1821, the paper joined forces with the Manchester Evening News. The usually loss-making Guardian was for years subsidised by the profitable afternoon newspaper.

Stephen Glover: These explosive exchanges will not solve the deeper problems of the British press

Last Tuesday's Daily Telegraph ran a long and exceptionally savage attack on The Guardian. There was little, if anything, new in the piece, which appeared in the business pages. It skilfully gathered together the known facts: looming redundancies, losses of £100,000 a day on The Guardian and The Observer, and a cash pile melting at an alarming rate.

Stephen Glover: Would the press have reported Tiger’s sex life if he were British?

Anyone who reads a newspaper will know rather more about the sex life of the golfer Tiger Woods than he or she bargained for, or perhaps wanted. Every newspaper, with the exception of the Financial Times, gave the story wall to wall coverage. Readers of the Guardian and The Times have been provided with almost as much information about Mr Woods' various affairs as readers of the Daily Mail or the Sun.

Stephen Glover: Telegraph's new hardman finishes Barclay revolution

The appointment of Tony Gallagher as editor of the Daily Telegraph confirms his dominance of the paper. It was he, rather than Will Lewis, the nominal editor, who largely oversaw the Telegraph's coverage of the MPs' expenses scandal. When Mr Lewis was recently absent on a three-month business course at Harvard, Mr Gallagher hardly needed to pick up the reins since they were already in his hand.

Stephen Glover: Cameron will offer no help to Murdoch in his media war

After The Sun’s recent attack on Gordon Brown over his illegible letter to the mother of a soldier killed in Afghanistan, the Prime Minister had what he described as a “very friendly” telephone conversation with the paper’s owner, Rupert Murdoch.

Stephen Glover: Murdoch's cheerleading for Labour is being forgotten

During Rupert Murdoch's long affair with New Labour, there were a few people on the left who went on expressing their loathing for the old rogue. The Guardian's Polly Toynbee springs to mind. But, for more than a decade, the man who had once been a hate figure became really not a bad chap after all.

Stephen Glover: Let's send more reporters to Brussels and lift the muslin veil

The President of the Czech Republic, Vaclav Klaus, has almost been run to earth, and will soon sign the Lisbon Treaty. It will then become law, and nothing an incoming Tory government has up its sleeve is likely to change that.

Stephen Glover: The sound and fury of the mob can never be a substitute for measured and reasoned debate

Last week was not a happy one for the media. It was a week in which the voice of the mob tended to drown out the voice of reason. First there was Jan Moir, and then there was Nick Griffin.

Stephen Glover: This injunction shows a real lack of respect for the freedom of the press

Super-injunctions are much more oppressive than a traditional court order

Stephen Glover: Not biased, just too nice: Is Davis quite the right man for Today?

Twittering is a new political weapon. Once, if you did not like some aspect of the BBC, you would say so openly. Norman Tebbit attacked it for bias. So did Alastair Campbell. Last week Ben Bradshaw, the Culture Secretary, twittered his disapproval of the Today programme's allegedly soft interviews of leading Tories. He described Evan Davis's questioning of Michael Gove as "disgracefully feeble," and his grilling of George Osborne as "wholly feeble and biased".

Stephen Glover: What are the chances for the country's first quality freesheet?

The news that the London Evening Standard is to be given away free from next Monday is mind-boggling. It will be the first time any publisher in this country has offered readers what is, after all, a pretty good newspaper for nothing. All existing freesheets are fairly downmarket, and do not have any pretensions to be complete newspapers.

Stephen Glover: This admission of guilt might be an own goal by the press

Nine out of ten people will probably sympathise with England's football manager, Fabio Capello, who has received an apology from two newspapers after being photographed on holiday on a beach. The News of the World and the Daily Mail have also paid what are described as "substantial donations" to charities chosen by Mr Capello.

Stephen Glover: When an editor's ambitions were too grandiose

The notion that The Guardian would close The Observer, or turn it into a weekly magazine, always seemed unlikely. I don't say there weren't one or two members of the Scott Trust (which owns both titles) who did not seriously consider the idea. Some senior Guardian executives have undoubtedly had it in for their sister paper for years.

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