For the record: 23/03/2009


"Radio is being dwarfed by classified, online display, search and the next generation don't believe in it as much." media analyst Claire Enders predicts a dire future for commercial radio

Spin a nasty web

As guest editor of the 'New Statesman' this week, Alastair Campbell's treatment of the Paul Dacre, editor of the 'Daily Mail', is so vicious and dishonest that one has to wonder what kind of tyrant the former 'Daily Mirror' political correspondent (below) might have been had he progressed to an editor's chair. Dacre replied to a Staggers survey of the use by editors of public education and health services, though many colleagues, including Lionel Barber of the 'Financial Times' and Richard Wallace of the 'Mirror' flatly ignored the magazine's request. Others, such as Alan Rusbridger of 'The Guardian', responded more evasively than Dacre. Campbell – often at war with the 'Mail' when he was at No 10 – showed his gratitude by commissioning Martin Rowson to draw a ghastly caricature of Dacre – thinly disguised as the editor of the 'Daily Gripe' – and one of his Etonian sons. Readers were deceived by a cover line claiming the 'Mail' editor had written a piece on "Why I love the NHS". The collector's edition included no less than five pictures of Ali himself. Just as well he went into spin-doctoring.

Maida hundred

Happy centenary to the BBC's legendary Maida Vale recording studios, home of the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

Schweppes ad tonic

The ad agency Mother and client Schweppes have hopped back two centuries, producing creative work inspired by the pictorial satirist William Hogarth. The great visual social commentator highlighted the growth of alcoholism in works such as Gin Lane and is not the most obvious advocate of the benefits of a G&T. But Mother creative Kyle Harman-Turner says Hogarth's prints have a "quintessentially British personality and humour", matching the wit of previous Schweppes ads. Today, the company unveils a Hogarthian poster mocking City slickers subsumed in the downturn, in two weeks another will question the abilities of the G20 leaders (below). Who'd have thought the 18th century would be teaching tricks to modern media?

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