Mirror editors Richard Wallace and Tina Weaver sacked on the spot as paper becomes seven-day operation

 

Two of Fleet Street’s most long-standing editors were sacked on the spot from their jobs at the Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror today amid further turmoil at the troubled news publishing group Trinity Mirror.

Richard Wallace, editor of the Daily Mirror for the past eight years, and Tina Weaver, who has led the Sunday Mirror for 11 years, were told to leave after being summoned to a meeting with Trinity Mirror Managing Director Mark Hollinshead, who told them their papers would be merged into a seven-day publishing operation in which they would play no part.

The seven-day operation strategy had been overseen by the company’s chief executive Sly Bailey, who is stepping down at the end of the year following shareholder dissatisfaction with the group’s performance under her leadership. The firings of Wallace and Weaver, who have a close relationship, were approved by the Trinity Mirror board yesterday but were seen by journalists as a parting gesture from Ms Bailey who had been angered by the pair’s opposition to her streamlining plans. “There has been resistance to the seven-day operation for the last couple of years and that’s something the chief executive is unhappy with,” said one well-placed source.

The sackings were rubber stamped by the board on the day that David Grigson, a former finance chief at Reuters and and the publisher Emap, took up his new role as chairman.

The company has appointed Lloyd Embley, the former editor of The People, as editor of both Mirror titles. Embley, who attended the private Malvern College and is a keen golfer and skier, joined the Daily Mirror as a sub-editor in 1994 and recently appeared as a witness at the Leveson inquiry where he said he was “not aware” of phone hacking having taken place at The People.

After accepting his new role, Embley stood on a desk in the Mirror’s newsroom, high up in the Canada Square tower in London’s Canary Wharf, and told journalists “We’re in this together”.

A shocked Wallace sent an email to his former staff imploring them to remain true to the “values” of the Daily Mirror and reminding them they had a duty to serve their readers. He said: “After 22 years on the world’s greatest paper it is time to move on – if rather unexpectedly”.

Wallace, a former showbusiness reporter who was given a traditional “banging out” send off by Mirror journalists as he left the office, has been editing the red top since the spectacular firing of Piers Morgan in 2004 over a scandal that followed the paper’s publication of faked photographs purporting to show the abuse of Iraqi prisoners by British troops. Morgan has since become a television personality with his own show on the American network CNN.

Trinity Mirror buried news of the departure of its two editors in the seventh paragraph of a news release announcing its “move to seven day publishing”. Despite Wallace’s firing, Mr Hollinshead argued that the Daily Mirror has recently been performing well. “The Daily Mirror is as strong as ever with year on year circulation trends, despite widespread cut price competition, out performing the market in 11 out of the last 12 months.”

Michelle Stanistreet, general secretary of the National Union of Journalists, accused Ms Bailey of a “monumental lack of vision” and described Trinity Mirror as a “company in crisis”. She said: “It says a lot about the board of Trinity Mirror that they have allowed chief executive Sly Bailey, finally on her way out after presiding over stupendous decline, to push such drastic measures through.”

The editors' biographies

Richard Wallace, 51, began his career at the Leicester Mercury at the age of 18, and made his name working on the Daily Mirror’s showbusiness desk. The highlight of his eight year editorship was the Daily Mirror being named Newspaper of the Year at the What the Papers Say awards in 2006.

Tina Weaver, 47, has been a tabloid journalist for more than 20 years. She started her national newspaper career at The People and was named Reporter of the Year for her work at Today newspaper in 1993. She became editor of the Sunday Mirror in 2001 and has been a member of the Press Complaints Commission.

Lloyd Embley, 46, educated at Malvern College and trained in local newspapers in Northamptonshire before joining the Daily Mirror as a sub-editor in 1994. He became editor of The People in 2008. He is the first seven day editor of the Mirror titles.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Life and Style
Phillips Idowu, Stella McCartney and Jessica Ennis
fashionMcCartney to continue designing Team GB Olympics kit until 2016
Sport
Shinji Kagawa and Reece James celebrate after the latter scores in Manchester United's 7-0 victory over LA Galaxy
football
Voices
voicesGood for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, writes Grace Dent
Sport
Farah returns to the track with something to prove
Commonwealth games
Life and Style
fashion Designs are part of feminist art project by a British student
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Campaign Manager

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: A leading marketing agency is currently ...

BI Analyst

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: A leading marketing agency in Central Lo...

DBA

£40000 - £55000 per annum + competitive: Progressive Recruitment: DBA, London,...

Web / Digital Analyst - SiteCatalyst or Google Analytics

competitive: Progressive Recruitment: My client who are a leading publisher in...

Day In a Page

Screwing your way to the top? Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth

Screwing your way to the top?

Good for Lana Del Rey for helping kill that myth, says Grace Dent
Will the young Britons fighting in Syria be allowed to return home and resume their lives?

Will Britons fighting in Syria be able to resume their lives?

Tony Blair's Terrorism Act 2006 has made it an offence to take part in military action abroad with a "political, ideological, religious or racial motive"
Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter, the wartime poster girl who became a feminist pin-up

Beyoncé poses as Rosie the Riveter

The wartime poster girl became the ultimate American symbol of female empowerment
The quest to find the perfect pair of earphones: Are custom, 3D printed earbuds the solution?

The quest to find the perfect pair of earphones

Earphones don't fit properly, offer mediocre audio quality and can even be painful. So the quest to design the perfect pair is music to Seth Stevenson's ears
US Army's shooting star: Lt-Col Steven Cole is the man Hollywood calls when it wants to borrow a tank or check a military uniform

Meet the US Army's shooting star

Lt-Col Steven Cole is the man Hollywood calls when it wants to borrow a tank or check a military uniform
Climate change threatens to make the antarctic fur seal extinct

Take a good look while you can

How climate change could wipe out this seal
Should emergency hospital weddings be made easier for the terminally ill?

Farewell, my lovely

Should emergency hospital weddings be made easier?
Man Booker Prize 2014 longlist: Crowdfunded novel nominated for first time

Crowdfunded novel nominated for Booker Prize

Paul Kingsnorth's 'The Wake' is in contention for the prestigious award
Vladimir Putin employs a full-time food taster to ensure his meals aren't poisoned

Vladimir Putin employs a full-time food taster

John Walsh salutes those brave souls who have, throughout history, put their knives on the line
Tour de France effect brings Hollywood blockbusters to Yorkshire

Tour de France effect brings Hollywood blockbusters to Yorkshire

A $25m thriller starring Sam Worthington to be made in God's Own Country
Will The Minerva Project - the first 'elite' American university to be launched in a century - change the face of higher learning?

Will The Minerva Project change the face of higher learning?

The university has no lecture halls, no debating societies, no sports teams and no fraternities. Instead, the 33 students who have made the cut at Minerva, will travel the world and change the face of higher learning
The 10 best pedicure products

Feet treat: 10 best pedicure products

Bags packed and all prepped for holidays, but feet in a state? Get them flip-flop-ready with our pick of the items for a DIY treatment
Commonwealth Games 2014: Great Scots! Planes and pipers welcome in Glasgow's Games

Commonwealth Games 2014

Great Scots! Planes and pipers welcome in Glasgow's Games
Jack Pitt-Brooke: Manchester City and Patrick Vieira make the right stand on racism

Jack Pitt-Brooke

Manchester City and Patrick Vieira make the right stand on racism
How Terry Newton tragedy made iron men seek help to tackle their psychological demons

How Newton tragedy made iron men seek help to tackle their psychological demons

Over a hundred rugby league players have contacted clinic to deal with mental challenges of game