Trendspotting #15

l Can you stomach it?

People with stomach ulcers are 50 per cent more likely to read The Mirror, The Sun or The Mail on Sunday than the national average, according to a study by marketing consultancy ICD. The study also found that those same ulcer sufferers are 80 per cent more likely to watch more than five hours of television a day. Now you might conclude that all that depressing TV news and EastEnders is stressing people out, while the tabloids are overstimulating their gastric juices. Or it might be that the unhealthy tend to be the poor and the poor tend to watch a lot of TV and read the tabloids. Still, the moral outrage of The Mail on Sunday can't be good for anyone's health.

l TV viewers grow thin on the ground

According to viewing figures in the first quarter of 1997, people now watch exactly half an hour less terrestrial TV a day than they did 10 years ago. In the first three months of 1987, average daily viewing of terrestrial TV in the UK was 4.04 hours a day. In the first quarter of this year this was down to 3.34 hours a day, according to the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising. The main beneficiary is, of course, satellite and cable channels. But figures from advertising agency Ogilvy & Mather suggest that the next generation won't watch much of those channels either. One third of all television use by children doesn't involve actually watching TV. They use the screen either to play computer games or watch videos.

l It's all foreign to me ...

Foreign news is the second biggest reason, after domestic news, why people buy national newspapers, while sport and television come a poor fourth and fifth. According to National Readership figures for 1996, 60 per cent of adults say that their favourite newspaper topic is European and foreign news. Only 35 per cent say the same about sport or TV listings. Having invested millions over the past few years in TV and sports supplements, you might think the national press would throw all that out. But the research only asked people about foreign news if their newspaper of choice actually carried any, which leaves out an awful lot of tabloid readers. Still, it might explain why you won't be able to throw a brick in a Hong Kong bar next month without hitting a British hack.

l The lucrative world of junk

Direct mail, the junk that lies in your communal hallway causing a fire risk and annoying neighbours, is growing, according to the latest figures from the Royal Mail. The sexiest advertising medium in the world now makes up over a fifth of every household's post, while addressed junk mail makes up another fifth. Add to this free newspapers, which are about 10 per cent of the postie's bag, and local leaflets etc that account for 50 per cent of your total mail. The average response to direct mail is a measly 7 per cent. The door-drop stuff from your local pizzeria or mini-cab firm gets a 2 per cent response. Well worth all those trees - if you're in direct mail.

l Courting the uptown boys

ITV has failed to attract all the motor racing fans who watch Formula One on the BBC. The San Marino Grand Prix was four million viewers down on the BBC's achievement and the Brazilian and Argentine Grand Prix were a million viewers down on last year's figures, according to a report by air-time buyers CIA Medianetwork. Does this mean that ITV has wasted its pounds 50m or more investment in the championship? No, it doesn't. ITV is about making money, not bettering the BBC. The Grand Prix has increased the numbers of upmarket men who watch ITV on a Sunday by 400 per cent, according to Marketing Week. Upmarket men are usually those least likely to watch ITV, so to the network, and its advertisers, they are worth their weight in goldn

News
Russell Brand was in typically combative form during his promotional interview with Newsnight's Evan Davis
peopleReports that Brand could stand for Mayor on an 'anti-politics' ticket
News
The clocks go forward an hour at 1am on Sunday 30 March
news
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor finds himself in a forest version of London in Doctor Who episode 'In the Forest of the Night'
TVReview: Is the Doctor ever going stop frowning? Apparently not.
News
Voluminous silk drawers were worn by Queen Victoria
newsThe silk underwear is part of a growing trade in celebrity smalls
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Sport
footballMatch report: Real fight back to ruin Argentinian's debut
News
Candidates with surnames that start with an A have an electoral advantage
newsVoters are biased towards names with letters near start of alphabet
Arts and Entertainment
Isis with Lord Grantham (Hugh Bonneville)
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Jay James
TVReview: Performances were stale and cheesier than a chunk of Blue Stilton left out for a month
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Head of Business Development and Analytics - TV

competitive benefits: Sauce Recruitment: Outstanding analytic expertise is req...

Head of ad sales international - Broadcast

competitive + bonus + benefits: Sauce Recruitment: Are you the king or Queen o...

Business Development Manager Content/Subscriptions

£50k + commission: Savvy Media Ltd: Great opportunity to work for a team that ...

Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £30000 per annum + uncapped: SThree: Do you feel like your sales role...

Day In a Page

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news: musician splits with manager after police investigate assault claims

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news

Former Dr Feelgood splits with manager after police investigate assault claims
Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands ahead of the US midterm elections

Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands

The Senator for Colorado is for gay rights, for abortion rights – and in the Republicans’ sights as they threaten to take control of the Senate next month
New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

Evidence found of contact between Easter Islanders and South America
Cerys Matthews reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of Dylan Thomas

Cerys Matthews on Dylan Thomas

The singer reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of the famous Welsh poet
DIY is not fun and we've finally realised this as a nation

Homebase closures: 'DIY is not fun'

Homebase has announced the closure of one in four of its stores. Nick Harding, who never did know his awl from his elbow, is glad to see the back of DIY
The Battle of the Five Armies: Air New Zealand releases new Hobbit-inspired in-flight video

Air New Zealand's wizard in-flight video

The airline has released a new Hobbit-inspired clip dubbed "The most epic safety video ever made"
Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month - but can you stomach the sweetness?

Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month

The combination of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg (and no actual pumpkin), now flavours everything from lattes to cream cheese in the US
11 best sonic skincare brushes

11 best sonic skincare brushes

Forget the flannel - take skincare to the next level by using your favourite cleanser with a sonic facial brush
Paul Scholes column: I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Phil Jones and Marcos Rojo

Paul Scholes column

I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Jones and Rojo
Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

While other sports are stalked by corruption, we are an easy target for the critics
Jamie Roberts exclusive interview: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Jamie Roberts: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Wales centre says he’s not coming home but is looking to establish himself at Racing Métro
How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?

A crime that reveals London's dark heart

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?