Media coverage of ethnic minority Britons 'promotes racism'

Poll finds 78 per cent of respondents shared deep concerns about the impact of the media's portrayal of minorities

Media Editor

Four out of five people believe that media coverage of ethnic minority Britons promotes racism.

A poll found that 78 per cent of respondents of all ethnic backgrounds believe that media portrayal of minorities encourages discrimination. Among people of Pakistani descent the figure rises to 94 per cent.

Even among white respondents there was deep concern about the impact of media coverage of ethnic minorities, with 76 per cent saying it was fuelling racism. White people had the same level of concern as Black Caribbeans and more than Indians (68 per cent) and Black Africans (67 per cent).

The findings coincide with intense media coverage of the arrival in Britain of new immigrants from Romania and Bulgaria following the lifting of working restrictions on 1 January. Among Eastern Europeans responding to the poll, 89 per cent thought media reporting was contributing to racism, the highest number after Pakistanis.

The findings, in a poll for the Runnymede Trust given to The Independent, prompted calls for media regulators to be more vigilant in addressing coverage of combustible subjects such as immigration and race.

On Monday night the controversial Channel 4 series Benefits Street, which has led to hundreds of complaints to the broadcaster and the media watchdog Ofcom, will switch its focus to the presence of Eastern European immigrants on James Turner Street in Birmingham, where 90 per cent of residents are said to be claiming social subsidies.

Helen Goodman, the shadow culture minister, said: “The responsibility of Ofcom is to ensure that broadcasters present news and information in a balanced way and clearly where racism intrudes this isn’t happening. I’m concerned by what I’ve heard of the Channel 4 programme Benefits Street, which follows on from their controversial coverage of the gypsy and traveller community.”

Rob Berkeley, director of the Runnymede Trust, a race equality think tank, said the media should consider the potential consequences of its reporting.

“Four out of five British people believe that the media’s portrayal of ethnic minorities promotes racism. This is true whether you’re Black, Asian or White. The vast majority of the British public questions the ability of the media to portray ethnic minorities in a fair and reasonable light,” he said.

“Nearly all of the British Pakistanis surveyed believed media portrayals of ethnic minorities promote racism. Runnymede is particularly concerned about the challenge this poses for improving relations between people of different ethnic groups. Our media must do more to respond to the real views and concerns of readers rather than promote stereotypes about Black and Asian people or immigrants.”

The Runnymede Trust poll was carried out by independent research organisation Ethnic Focus and based on responses from 750 adults.

The next episode of Benefits Street shows racial tensions running high on James Turner Street as Romanian immigrants move in, followed by a group of travellers in caravans.

One of the show’s characters, Fungi, is seen shouting “You can’t even speak English!” at the Romanians. Later he is filmed walking past the caravans muttering: “I’m going to petrol bomb the lot of you, you fucking idiots.”

The Romanians, who attempt to build a scrap metal business, are presented as being harder working than many of the established residents. They are accused by another main character in the series, Black Dee, of stealing children’s bicycles and scooters. Another character, Becky, says: “The Romanians think they own our street these days.”

Others accuse the immigrants of creating rubbish problems. “Fucking tramps! Fuck off!” says one.

A Polish woman gets married to an Algerian man. But neighbours are filmed expressing the view that the arrangement is a sham.

The Romanians find life in Britain harder than they expected. “In Romania life was better. We had water, gas and electricity,” complains one.

A large Romanian family of 12, in which a 12 year-old boy is the only one able to speak English, leaves the street after landlord problems. A group of 14 Romanian field workers move in. They too become disillusioned and one complains of his boss: “He’s keeping me in a field for 16 hours, am I a slave?”

Unable to survive on £10 a day, some leave to live in a park in central London. “It’s better here than in Birmingham,” says one.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Ashdown Group: Lead Web Developer (ASP.NET, C#) - City of London

£45000 - £50000 per annum + Excellent benefits: Ashdown Group: Lead Web Develo...

Recruitment Genius: External Relations Executive

£33000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An External Relations Executive is requi...

Recruitment Genius: Senior Digital Project Manager

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This established Digital Agency based in East ...

Guru Careers: Sales Director / Business Development Manager

£35 - 45K + COMMISSION (NEG): Guru Careers: A Sales Director / Business Develo...

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee