WOULD YOU WORK FOR DIANA? THE KINGS OF PUBLICITY GIVE THEIR VIEWS

Max Clifford (OJ Simpson, Frank Sinatra, the Beatles, Antonia de Sancha)

I've got a lot of time for her, but what she requires is a full-time PR, almost 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It wouldn't be practical or possible for me. She's just about the biggest star in the world. There's so much going on in her life which requires expert guidance.

The operation incident was handled badly. I would have handled it very differently. A couple of months after, the mother or father would have revealed, despite saying they were sworn to secrecy, how wonderful Diana had been. In spite of her troubles she'd taken time out to see the little child afterwards. That way you turn a damaging situation into a hugely successful one.

It's very easy to lose take of reality. When she apparently says she doesn't need somebody, it's total nonsense. She needs somebody more than ever. But she needs someone where she will do what they say.

The announcement about resigning the charities was obviously damaging. It appeared to everyone as an attempt to get back for losing the HRH title. That is not the Queen of Hearts. It's not someone whose interest is other people. Whether that's how it was, that's how it appeared. PR is about promoting an image that often is nothing to do with reality.

Her role is Chicago, Argentina, Pakistan, Great Ormond Street, using her popularity and charisma to help other people. I would have had her at the Olympic Games, announcing a major Children's Olympic charity, and the person whose idea it was would be Princess Diana. Always give credit to the star.

Phil Symes (former clients include Elizabeth Hurley, Pamela Bordes, Naomi Campbell, Paul McCartney)

She would be the dream client. There is a woman there who really needs some help, and that's not been happening, whether it's her fault or not. We want to see more of her as a mother, a woman of dignity who is also very beautiful. She must continue to look wonderful. No books, no films, no television. But she does need to be in the public going about her life.

Elizabeth Hurley and Princess Diana are not dissimilar. They both had enormous public sympathy, being slightly wronged people. But the public sympathy Diana holds has been somewhat eroded. There have been too many public outbursts and there have been too many what seem to be stunted photocalls or events. It looks too obviously manipulated.

The greatest thing she still has going for her is that the public adore her, whether she has the HRH title or not. Her biggest problem is that she has been too impetuous. There's also a sense of a woman reacting vindictively rather than with dignity. Announcements, like stepping down from the charities, can be timed with other major events, so they become less prominent.

I always thought she'd work better with men, she follows their advice better. She appears to have a higher regard for men than women. She might always be suspicious of women, that another was trying to steal her limelight.

Two avenues ought to be explored for her future. She is a great ambassador for England in terms of the business community. And who better to front the millennium celebration campaign? The public also see her as someone who cares for children, and that should be part of her role.

Brian Basham (Robert Maxwell, Saatchi brothers, Mohamed al-Fayed, Ernest Saunders)

She's the client from hell. You wouldn't want to go anywhere near her. She's completely potty. She makes Robert Maxwell look like a pussy cat.

I know nothing about her, but the indications are that she's obsessive and doesn't seem in control of herself. She seems the most frightening and compromising of clients, a person who doesn't let the right hand know what the left hand is doing. One of her advisers resigned because she kept secret about going on Panorama. You could risk your reputation, that's why you wouldn't want her.

However, she does seem to show, or somebody behind her does, a talent for tactical PR. The skill with which she crafted the letter resigning from 100 charities, then got a friend to act as her spokesperson, was masterful.

She will be film-star famous for as long as we have a monarchy, since she is mother of the future king. In many ways she is the Royal Family's saviour. They've got nobody else that attractive. The Queen is 70. Who can give the family any appeal? If she died tomorrow and Prince Charles took over, there is a strong chance the monarchy would not survive.

Diana's role will ebb and flow. She's immensely cheapened. The association with the Duchess of York is damaging. It's so tainted. Diana then dropped everything and ran home over the resignation of her PR adviser. It shows how important to her it is. She should have played it coolly, and issued a short statement saying she was enjoying a "much needed holiday with her children". It looks like she left her children behind to run back and look after her image.

But time retrieves anything. Companies put out regular results. The Royal Family has weddings, deaths and births. The next big thing is the death of the Queen Mother, which will give them all a tremendous boost.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Recruitment Genius: Subscriptions and Marketing Assistant

£12500 - £15000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A subscriptions and marketing a...

Recruitment Genius: Advertising / Media Sales Executive

£15000 - £22200 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An ambitious candidate is requi...

Recruitment Genius: Sub-editor - Editorial - Publishing

£14000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A sub-editor is required to joi...

Recruitment Genius: B2B Media Sales Professional - Work From Home

£20000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Enjoying rapid growth we contin...

Day In a Page

Greece debt crisis: EU 'family' needs to forgive rather than punish an impoverished state

EU 'family' needs to forgive rather than punish an impoverished state

An outbreak of malaria in Greece four years ago helps us understand the crisis, says Robert Fisk
Gaza, a year on from Operation Protective Edge: The traumatised kibbutz on Israel's front line, still recovering from last summer's war with Hamas

Gaza, a year on from Operation Protective Edge

The traumatised kibbutz on Israel's front line, still recovering from last summer's war with Hamas
How to survive electrical storms: What are the chances of being hit by lightning?

Heavy weather

What are the chances of being hit by lightning?
World Bodypainting Festival 2015: Bizarre and brilliant photos celebrate 'the body as art'

World Bodypainting Festival 2015

Bizarre and brilliant photos celebrate 'the body as art'
alt-j: A private jet, a Mercury Prize and Latitude headliners

Don't call us nerds

Craig Mclean meets alt-j - the math-folk act who are flying high
How to find gold: The Californian badlands, digging out crevasses and sifting sludge

How to find gold

Steve Boggan finds himself in the Californian badlands, digging out crevasses and sifting sludge
Singing accents: From Herman's Hermits and David Bowie to Alesha Dixon

Not born in the USA

Lay off Alesha Dixon: songs sound better in US accents, even our national anthem
10 best balsamic vinegars

10 best balsamic vinegars

Drizzle it over salad, enjoy it with ciabatta, marinate vegetables, or use it to add depth to a sauce - this versatile staple is a cook's best friend
Wimbledon 2015: Brief glimpses of the old Venus but Williams sisters' epic wars belong to history

Brief glimpses of the old Venus but Williams sisters' epic wars belong to history

Serena dispatched her elder sister 6-4, 6-3 in eight minutes more than an hour
Greece says 'No': A night of huge celebrations in Athens as voters decisively back Tsipras and his anti-austerity stance in historic referendum

Greece referendum

Greeks say 'No' to austerity and plunge Europe into crisis
Ten years after the 7/7 terror attacks, is Britain an altered state?

7/7 bombings anniversary

Ten years after the terror attacks, is Britain an altered state?
Beautiful evening dresses are some of the loveliest Donatella has created

Versace haute couture review

Beautiful evening dresses are some of the loveliest Donatella has ever created
No hope and no jobs, so Gaza's young risk their lives, climb the fence and run for it

No hope and no jobs in Gaza

So the young risk their lives and run for it
Fashion apps: Retailers roll together shopping and social networking for mobile customers

Fashion apps

Retailers roll together shopping and social networking for mobile customers
The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy