A.D.J. Flowerdew

Transport economist and planner


Anthony David John Flowerdew, management scientist, economist and operational researcher: born Salisbury 7 November 1935; senior planner, GLC 1966-68; Deputy Director of Research, Commission on the Third London Airport 1968-70; Senior Lecturer in Urban Economics, LSE 1971-77; Professor of Management Science, University of Kent at Canterbury 1978-89; partner, Marcial Echinique & Partners 1977-85, chairman 1985-89, managing director 1989-91; married 1959 Jenny Lewis (died 1978; one son, one daughter), 1979 Lesley Williamson (*ée Murdoch; two sons); died Canterbury 28 July 2007.

A.D.J. Flowerdew was a consultant, planner and enthusiast in the fields of transport economics and operational research (OR) – the use of scientific methods to solve organisational problems. His areas of expertise provided a unique resource for city planning authorities around the world wanting to link transport planning with land-use issues for balanced development. Tony Flowerdew believed in combining theory with the ability to make decisions. He was an avid thinker, consulter, arguer, competitor, dancer and assured wearer of widely ranging hats – metaphorical and literal.

Anthony David John Flowerdew was born in 1935 in Salisbury, son of Douglas Flowerdew, a soldier (and later a rector), and his wife, Sheila. After Eton (where he went on a scholarship), he read Maths and Moral Sciences at King's College, Cambridge. His fellow student and friend, the writer A.S. Byatt, remembers his outdoing those taking English in quotation quizzes.

He began his career in the operational research department of the National Coal Board as part of his National Service. Before universities developed OR courses, the public sector led the application of quantitative and analytical techniques to questions of production and management, and Flowerdew's years at the NCB saw him develop into an expert in the field. After five years in consultancy, he went to the Greater London Council in 1966 as a senior transport planner.

From 1968 to 1970, he was Deputy Director of Research for the Roskill Commission investigating the siting of the envisaged third London airport. The seminal work of the research team and the commission advanced the frontiers of cost-benefit analysis for project evaluation – new in Britain for major projects. Flowerdew smoothed the relations between the researchers and the lawyers at the public inquiry, his verse commentary on the proceedings serving as a particular aid to good humour.

After the inquiry, momentum built up for locating the airport at Maplin in Essex. Among his concerns about the project, Flowerdew cited disruption to bird life, access links, and proposals for a new industrial area and city (for the workforce). In Parliament, Anthony Crosland backed his line that more research was needed. The plans were dropped in 1974, and Stansted expanded. Subsequently, Flowerdew advised on a second airport for Sydney.

In 1971, he joined the London School of Economics where, with two colleagues, he developed a stimulating master's course in urban economics. From 1977, he was the economist at the Marcial Echenique and Partners consultancy, providing models as tools for policy-makers in transport around the world. Combining land-use and transport issues allowed for intelligent policy-making in, for instance, the expanding city of São Paulo – which was acquiring half a million residents a year in the late Seventies. Instead of criss-crossing the city with motorways at vast expense, Flowerdew showed how good public transport could prevent gridlock, while land use could be tailored to fit with transport developments.

When he worked as a consultant, lively and productive discussions would continue into an evening's socialising. His strong ideas would not always fit clients' views, but he would convince them with illustrations matched to their own areas and lives. When working in a foreign country, he would always learn some of the language.

Moving to the University of Kent at Canterbury in 1978, appointed to the inaugural Chair in Management Science (where he remained until 1989), Flowerdew enjoyed interacting with students and was interested in their future careers. In 1987 the Duke of Edinburgh visited the campus, and, having inspected ranks of computers, opined that management was an art not a science. Typically, Flowerdew initiated a lively exchange (raising the much-questioned term Military Intelligence). The ensuing invitation from Prince Philip to visit the nearby military establishment at Ashford led to lasting links with the university.

Tony Flowerdew lectured at UN conferences, and worked on EU transport projects. His report Congestion and Public Transport Finance (1993) recommended road-pricing and pollution tax to fund public improvements in the worst-hit cities. In 1995 he led an international team of specialists for the World Bank's study of Guatemala's national transport. Lectures in Japan on economics and environment in 1997 were the starting point for a still unfinished book on these subjects.

Dan Flowerdew

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
News
news
News
peopleIt seems you can't silence Katie Hopkins, even on Christmas Day...
Arts and Entertainment
tvChristmas special reviewed
Arts and Entertainment
Wolf (Nathan McMullen), Ian (Dan Starky), The Doctor (Peter Capaldi), Clara (Jenna Coleman), Santa Claus (Nick Frost) in the Doctor Who Christmas Special (BBC/Photographer: David Venni)
tvOur review of the Doctor Who Christmas Special
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksA year of political gossip, levity and intrigue from the sharpest pen in Westminster
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Jenna Coleman as Clara Oswald in the Doctor Who Christmas special
tvForget the rumours that Clara Oswald would be quitting the Tardis
Arts and Entertainment
Japanese artist Megumi Igarashi showing a small mascot shaped like a vagina
art
Life and Style
fashion
Arts and Entertainment
Left to right: Stanley Tucci, Sophie Grabol and Christopher Eccleston in ‘Fortitude’
tvSo Sky Atlantic arrived in Iceland to film their new and supposedly snow-bound series 'Fortitude'...
Arts and Entertainment
tv
News
The Queen delivers her Christmas message
newsTwitter reacts to Her Majesty's Christmas Message
Sport
sport
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Ashdown Group: Senior Marketing Executive- City of London, Old Street

£40000 - £43000 per annum + benefits: Ashdown Group: Senior Marketing Executiv...

Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager

£40000 - £43000 per annum + benefits: Ashdown Group: An international organisa...

Ashdown Group: Internal Recruiter -Rugby, Warwickshire

£25000 - £30000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Internal Recruiter -Rugby, Warwicksh...

Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager/Marketing Controller (Financial Services)

£70000 - £75000 per annum + benefits: Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager/Marketi...

Day In a Page

A Christmas without hope: Fears grow in Gaza that the conflict with Israel will soon reignite

Christmas without hope

Gaza fears grow that conflict with Israel will soon reignite
After 150 years, you can finally visit the grisliest museum in the country

The 'Black Museum'

After 150 years, you can finally visit Britain's grisliest museum
No ho-ho-hos with Nick Frost's badass Santa

No ho-ho-hos with Nick Frost's badass Santa

Doctor Who Christmas Special TV review
Chilly Christmas: Swimmers take festive dip for charity

Chilly Christmas

Swimmers dive into freezing British waters for charity
Veterans' hostel 'overwhelmed by kindness' for festive dinner

Homeless Veterans appeal

In 2010, Sgt Gary Jamieson stepped on an IED in Afghanistan and lost his legs and an arm. He reveals what, and who, helped him to make a remarkable recovery
Isis in Iraq: Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment by militants

'Jilan killed herself in the bathroom. She cut her wrists and hanged herself'

Yazidi girls killing themselves to escape rape and imprisonment
Ed Balls interview: 'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'

Ed Balls interview

'If I think about the deficit when I'm playing the piano, it all goes wrong'
He's behind you, dude!

US stars in UK panto

From David Hasselhoff to Jerry Hall
Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz: What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?

Grace Dent's Christmas Quiz

What are you – a festive curmudgeon or top of the tree?
Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Nasa planning to build cloud cities in airships above Venus

Planet’s surface is inhospitable to humans but 30 miles above it is almost perfect
Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history - clocks, rifles, frogmen’s uniforms and colonial helmets

Clocks, rifles, swords, frogmen’s uniforms

Surrounded by high-rise flats is a little house filled with Lebanon’s history
Return to Gaza: Four months on, the wounds left by Israel's bombardment have not yet healed

Four months after the bombardment, Gaza’s wounds are yet to heal

Kim Sengupta is reunited with a man whose plight mirrors the suffering of the Palestinian people
Gastric surgery: Is it really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Is gastric surgery really the answer to the UK's obesity epidemic?

Critics argue that it’s crazy to operate on healthy people just to stop them eating
Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction Part 2 - now LIVE

Homeless Veterans appeal: Christmas charity auction

Bid on original art, or trips of a lifetime to Africa or the 'Corrie' set, and help Homeless Veterans
Pantomime rings the changes to welcome autistic theatre-goers

Autism-friendly theatre

Pantomime leads the pack in quest to welcome all