Andrew Miller: Concert promoter and lauded fund-raiser

 

Nobody buys a concert ticket because of the name of the promoter at the top of the poster or on the ticket. Yet when something goes wrong on a tour or at an outdoor event the promoter often gets the blame – from the paying public, the media and the artists themselves. That this hardly ever happened to the British concert promoter Andrew Miller, during his four decades of putting on the likes of Barry Manilow, Meat Loaf and Nana Mouskouri, is testament to his organisational and personal qualities.

Held in high regard by his business peers and his long-standing clients, Miller was also greatly admired for his charity work on behalf of Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy. This began in January 1976 when he was approached by Lady Mary Bradford to help support the treatment and therapy programmes developed by Paul Nordoff and Clive Robbins to improve the quality of life of disabled and sick people of all ages through music.

Drawing on his considerable list of contacts, Miller convened a fund-raising committee which included musicians, managers, a Moët & Chandon executive and Willie Robertson, the insurance broker who had pioneered the introduction of insurance cover for performers and who became a lifelong friend. Miller and Robertson proved a formidable partnership, which continued until Robertson's death last year and established Nordoff-Robbins as the premier charity supported by the British music industry to this day.

In June 1976, the committee held its first Silver Clef Award luncheon,honouring The Who and giving theailing Nordoff a platform to publicise his work a few months before his death. The proceeds wiped out the Music Therapy Charity's overdraft and the event became a regular fixture in the music calendar.

However, Miller had bigger plans. He wanted to put Nordoff Robbins on a firmer financial footing and help the charity open its own therapy centre in London. He also intended to give the music industry the opportunity to build a BRIT School for the Performing Arts in Croydon. To raise the necessary funds, in 1990 he staged Knebworth '90 at the Hertfordshire country house where Pink Floyd and Genesis had held landmark concerts. Both returned to join a line-up that included Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Elton John, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, Dire Straits, Status Quo and Tears For Fears, all previous recipients of the Nordoff Robbins Silver Clef Award.

The British stars performed for free in front of 120,000 fans and millions watching around the world on MTV. A live album and video helped the £1million profit from the day grow six-fold in as many months and enabled both projects to go ahead. The three years Miller spent planning Knebworth '90 alongside his day-to-day concert promotions activities had been worthwhile. Katie Melua, Adele, Imogen Heap and Jessie J, all BRIT school alumni, are undoubtedly indebted to him for their training.

Born in 1946 to GP parents, Miller was the second child of five. After completing his education at Shrewsbury School, he moved to Texas and worked there during the late 1960s. The threat of the Vietnam draft brought him back to Britain, where he joined the International Entertainment agency and met his second wife, Anna, another recently recruited employee.

In 1975 he launched Andrew Miller Promotions and never looked back as he promoted tours by Mike Oldfield, Gallagher and Lyle, Supertramp, Twiggy and Joan Armatrading. In 1976, he showed his customary dedication and commitment to the job when he called on Armatrading, on the day she headlined the Royal Albert Hall, between his wedding reception and his departure on honeymoon, with Anna still in her wedding dress.

A gentleman operating in what can be a cut-throat world, Miller often did business on a handshake, as in the case of Manilow, who he promoted for over three decades in partnership with Danny Betesh, the MD of Kennedy Street Enterprises, until the Inland Revenue insisted they formalise the relationship. In 1983 Miller staged a memorable Manilow concert attended by 50,000 at Blenheim Palace, stately home of the Duke of Marlborough, and returned there with Van Morrison and Armatrading in 2004 and Rod Stewart and Diana Ross in 2005.

He also oversaw the opening of music therapy units in Croydon and Newbury, as well as services in the North and South West of England, and he inspired other countries to develop their own facilities. In 1994, Miller and Robertson received the Music Industry Trust Award.

"Andrew and I worked together for over three decades," Betesh said. "I first met him when he sold me a Barry White show at the old Belle Vue in Manchester in the '70s. He became a lifelong friend. He was a very, very good man, very principled and good-hearted. The huge amounts of money he raised for Nordoff Robbins was a wonderful thing, a terrific legacy."

Andrew Robert Cameron Miller, concert promoter and fund-raiser: born Shrewsbury 12 July 1946; twice married (two daughters); died London 16 February 2012.

News
The current recommendation from Britain's Chief Medical Officer, is that people refrain from drinking on at least two days a week
food + drinkTheory is that hangovers are caused by methanol poisoning
Life and Style
techConcept would see planes coated in layer of micro-sensors and able to sense wear and tear
News
Patrick Stewart in the classiest ice bucket to date
people
News
scienceExcitement from alien hunters at 'evidence' of extraterrestrial life
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn evocation of the conflict through the eyes of those who lived through it
Sport
David Moyes gets soaked
sport Moyes becomes latest manager to take part in the ALS challenge
Voices
A meteor streaks across the sky during the Perseid Meteor Shower at a wind farm near Bogdanci, south of Skopje, Macedonia, in the early hours of 13 August
voicesHagel and Dempsey were pure Hollywood. They only needed Tom Cruise, says Robert Fisk
Life and Style
Horst P Horst mid-fashion shoot in New York, 1949
fashionFar-reaching retrospective to celebrate Horst P Horst's six decades of creativity
News
Members and supporters of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) community walk with a rainbow flag during a rally in July
i100
Life and Style
Black Ivory Coffee is made using beans plucked from elephants' waste after ingested by the animals
food + drinkFirm says it has created the "rarest" coffee in the world
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

JavaScript Developer (C++ / C# / HTML, Java Angular.js) London

£50000 - £60000 per annum: Harrington Starr: A world leading business intellig...

Application Support Analyst-(UNIX, Linux, Financial Services)

£40000 - £60000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Application Support Analyst-(UNIX...

Application Support Analyst - SQL, UNIX, Linux

£30000 - £50000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Application Support Analyst - SQL...

Application Support - FIX protocol, UNIX, SQL, Windows, OMS

£40000 - £60000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Application Support - FIX protoco...

Day In a Page

All this talk of an ‘apocalyptic’ threat is simply childish

Robert Fisk: All this talk of an ‘apocalyptic’ threat is simply childish

Chuck Hagel and Martin Dempsey were pure Hollywood. They only needed Tom Cruise
Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

So claims an EU report which points to the Italian Mob’s alleged grip on everything from public works to property
Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

Once the poor relation, the awards show now has the top stars and boasts the best drama
What happens to African migrants once they land in Italy during the summer?

What happens to migrants once they land in Italy?

Memphis Barker follows their trail through southern Europe
French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

The ugly causeway is being dismantled, an elegant connection erected in its place. So everyone’s happy, right?
Frank Mugisha: Uganda's most outspoken gay rights activist on changing people's attitudes, coming out, and the threat of being attacked

Frank Mugisha: 'Coming out was a gradual process '

Uganda's most outspoken gay rights activist on changing people's attitudes, coming out, and the threat of being attacked
Radio 1 to hire 'YouTube-famous' vloggers to broadcast online

Radio 1’s new top ten

The ‘vloggers’ signed up to find twentysomething audience
David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

A blistering attack on US influence on British television has lifted the savvy head of Channel 4 out of the shadows
Florence Knight's perfect picnic: Make the most of summer's last Bank Holiday weekend

Florence Knight's perfect picnic

Polpetto's head chef shares her favourite recipes from Iced Earl Grey tea to baked peaches, mascarpone & brown sugar meringues...
Horst P Horst: The fashion photography genius who inspired Madonna comes to the V&A

Horst P Horst comes to the V&A

The London's museum has delved into its archives to stage a far-reaching retrospective celebrating the photographer's six decades of creativity
Mark Hix recipes: Try our chef's summery soups for a real seasonal refresher

Mark Hix's summery soups

Soup isn’t just about comforting broths and steaming hot bowls...
Tim Sherwood column: 'It started as a three-horse race but turned into the Grand National'

Tim Sherwood column

I would have taken the Crystal Palace job if I’d been offered it soon after my interview... but the whole process dragged on so I had to pull out
Eden Hazard: Young, gifted... not yet perfect

Eden Hazard: Young, gifted... not yet perfect

Eden Hazard admits he is still below the level of Ronaldo and Messi but, after a breakthrough season, is ready to thrill Chelsea’s fans
Tim Howard: I’m an old dog. I don’t get too excited

Tim Howard: I’m an old dog. I don’t get too excited

The Everton and US goalkeeper was such a star at the World Cup that the President phoned to congratulate him... not that he knows what the fuss is all about
Match of the Day at 50: Show reminds us that even the most revered BBC institution may have a finite lifespan – thanks to the opposition

Tom Peck on Match of the Day at 50

The show reminds us that even the most revered BBC institution may have a finite lifespan – thanks to the opposition