Angela Haygarth-Jackson

Information science pioneer

Angela Haygarth-Jackson was a pioneer in the new discipline of "information science" and also had the distinction of achieving senior management status within ICI (Imperial Chemical Industries) at a time when women managers were few and far between in the chemical industry.



Angela Ray Haygarth- Jackson, information scientist: born Heaton Mersey, Cheshire 25 July 1929; information scientist, ICI 1956-86, Head, Literature Services Section 1968-84, Head, Information Services Section 1984-86; OBE 1984; died Bowdon, Cheshire c23 March 2004.



Angela Haygarth-Jackson was a pioneer in the new discipline of "information science" and also had the distinction of achieving senior management status within ICI (Imperial Chemical Industries) at a time when women managers were few and far between in the chemical industry.

She was the first woman to hold the office of President of the Institute of Information Scientists, in 1983-84. Appointed OBE in 1984 for services to information science during her presidential year, she was an active member of many national and international committees including the Royal Society Scientific Information Committee, the British Library Advisory Council, and the International Users Council of the Chemical Abstracts Service Division of the American Chemical Society. Although not a chemist, in 1993 she was awarded fellowship of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Angela Ray Haygarth- Jackson was born in Heaton Mersey in Cheshire in 1929, and educated at Cheltenham Ladies' College and Manchester University, where she was awarded an MSc in Botany. Deciding not to pursue further research, she joined ICI Pharmaceuticals Division in 1956 as an information scientist in the Techno-Commercial Department then based in Blackley, Manchester.

She transferred to Alderley Park, Cheshire, in 1957, and started to develop the division's information services as a member of the library staff. In 1968 she was promoted to Head of Literature Services Section with responsibility for the three libraries and technical information services that supported ICI Pharmaceuticals' international business. When, in 1984, Information Services Section was formed from the merger of literature services and data services, she headed an even larger group.

Over the years, as new technology became available, Haygarth-Jackson and her colleagues implemented dramatic advances in information processing techniques. This had an impact not just on the company's pharmaceuticals division: she was also a member of the management team which co-ordinated activities within the ICI Group Information System.

There were very few women of Haygarth-Jackson's managerial rank in ICI in the early 1980s. A handful of them used to lunch together occasionally in what their male colleagues called the "Ms Mafia", a term that amused Haygarth- Jackson. She was by no means a feminist in the 1970s sense, but she was a mentor and example to the many women who worked for her; a caring manager who valued her staff and developed them to their maximum potential.

She lectured widely on information science, and in 1979 undertook a three-week tour of Australasia to give nine lectures on new technologies and resources available in literature services. In 1986 she spent three weeks in China advising on library and information science matters. She was an external examiner of the MSc course in Information Studies for the Department of Information Studies at Sheffield University.

Continuing to serve the profession in her retirement, she was the editor of Training and Education for Online (1989). She was chairman of the editorial board of the Journal of Documentation for many years, finally resigning at the end of 2001.

Those who had never met Angela Haygarth-Jackson, in particular Americans, were often advised that meeting her would be like meeting the Queen. Perhaps there was a slight physical resemblance, but the greatest similarity was in the effortless social graces, hospitality and genuine interest in people. Angela was certainly not regal in the "not amused" sense: she enjoyed recounting the tale of her chauffeur-driven car following the dustcart into Buckingham Palace when she was invested as OBE.

She lived in the family home in Bowdon, Cheshire, for 40 years. She was a do-it-yourself enthusiast and did her own painting and wallpapering. The tapestries displayed in the house are a tribute to her embroidery skills. She was keen on the countryside and an ardent supporter of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

Wendy Warr

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Office Administrator

£16000 - £20000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Established managed services IT...

Recruitment Genius: Customer Service Advisor

£15000 - £16000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Customer Service Advisor is r...

Recruitment Genius: Plant Fitter - Construction Industry

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This well established construction equipment d...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£18000 - £23000 per annum + Uncapped Commission: SThree: As a Trainee Recruitm...

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003