Gerry Anderson: Thunderbirds creator whose puppet adventures thrilled millions of children across the world

He was always thinking to himself, 'Why can't I work with actors and do the thing properly?'

Gerry Anderson was responsible for some of the most instantly recognisable characters and series ever made for television. Never mind that most of his creations came with strings attached (quite literally), shows like Thunderbirds, Stingray and Captain Scarlet remain timeless, delighting and inspiring generation upon generation of children. Anderson once received a thank you letter from a scientist working for Nasa whose imagination was fired as a child watching one of his shows.

But how different it could have been. Anderson’s career in puppetry really began as a fluke. In the late 1950s he was running a fledgling production company hoping to land glamorous documentary work or even feature film assignments. The phone never rang. As he crawled ever closer towards bankruptcy a children’s writer offered him a batch of scripts for a puppet show called The Adventures of Twizzle. At the time Anderson knew nothing about children’s television and even less about puppetry. “We didn’t want to do it,” he recalled. “But we were broke. I was ashamed of it. It was not what I wanted to do. If they’d asked me to make a film about crocodiles, you might now be talking to a crocodile expert.” More than once Anderson was to claim that his life and career was ruled more by chance than design.

Gerry Anderson was born in 1929 in north London. His was a background of grinding poverty and zero education: home was a one-room flat he shared with his parents and elder brother that had no running water and neighbours which included one ex-con and a prostitute. Worse than being poor, the Anderson household was also a deeply unhappy one, his mother and father were temperamentally unsuited and bickered constantly. Anderson’s father, who barely scraped a living selling cigarettes, was a heavy gambler and usually in debt.

When he left the flat he was known to lock his two sons inside to stop his wife from leaving. When Anderson was 13 his mother finally walked out, taking the children with her. Always the dutiful son, Anderson later persuaded his parents to get back together, but the acrimony was still there and when his father died his mother refused to attend the funeral.

Entering technical college, Anderson set his heart on a career as a plasterer. Though he was extremely gifted, lime in the plaster caused dermatitis; he lost the skin on both hands and on doctor’s orders he was forced to abandon the profession. It was a crushing blow. So Anderson moved on to his second choice of career: the movies, which had always fascinated him as a child watching the adventures of Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers.

It was to be a long and tough apprenticeship, ideal grounding for his future role as producer and director of a unique brand of film-making. Working his way up from cutting room assistant, editor and then dubbing editor, he landed a job at the famous Gainsborough studios where one of his more interesting duties entailed recutting Margaret Lockwood’s heaving bosom for the American version of The Wicked Lady (1945).

By the mid-1950s Anderson was directing TV commercials and documentaries for an independent company, and it was here where he met and fell in love with Sylvia Thamm. The only problem was, he was already married, with two small daughters. A quick divorce enabled him to marry Sylvia but the decision to leave his wife and family was one he never truly forgave himself for. “When I look back I am ashamed,” he once said. “I don’t know how I could have done it.” Although Anderson kept in touch with both daughters, his relationship with them was never particularly close and over the years they drifted apart.

In 1956 Anderson took the biggest and bravest gamble of his life when he and Sylvia ploughed their last £500 into setting up their own film studio at Islet Park, an old mansion house near Maidenhead. Bedrooms and a ballroom were converted into workshops and offices and after a shaky start they were churning out highly popular puppet shows, beginning with The Adventures of Twizzle (1957), then Torchy the Battery Boy (1960) and Four Feather Falls (1960). Yet all the time Anderson strove to make each of his creations as much like a normal film as possible in the hope of landing live action assignments. “By making the puppets as lifelike as possible I thought people would see that I’d be good at making feature films.”

What people saw instead was his genius for the puppet genre, and more shows followed – Supercar (1961) and Fireball XL5 (1962), each one increasingly relying upon science fiction for their thrills. Then came Stingray, which made history in 1964 as the first colour television series produced in Britain.

Anderson was now head of a mini industry, employing a staff of 250 film-makers, designers and special effects men at new and more technically advanced studios in Slough. He was doing well financially, too, after the showbusiness tycoon Lew Grade bought out his company in 1962, though Anderson remained creatively in control and received 10 per cent of all profits.

Those profits skyrocketed with his next show, Thunderbirds (1965). Named after Thunderbird Field, the Arizona airfield where his elder brother, who was killed during the Second World War, had trained to be a Mosquito pilot, the adventures of millionaire Jeff Tracey’s sons – Scott, Virgil, Alan, Gordon and John (all named after American astronauts) and their daring rescues of people in peril was an instant  phenomenon.

Sold to 66 countries the show earned Anderson the Royal Television Society silver medal for outstanding artistic achievement. As for its enduring cult appeal, winning over successive generations of fans, Anderson was clear: “Thunderbirds gives kids what they want – death and destruction – and yet the underlying story is about saving life, not destroying it.”

Although across the years Anderson had introduced numerous innovations in order to perfect his puppetry technique, coining the term Supermarianation to describe it, he remained professionally stifled and dissatisfied with his pioneering achievements, always thinking, “Why am I working with puppets, why can’t I work with actors and do the thing properly?”

After two more Supermarianation classics, Captain Scarlet (1967) and Joe 90 (1968), Anderson finally got his wish and moved into the live action arena with the blessing and financial backing of Lew Grade. Testament to Anderson’s genius, his first two live action shows for television, UFO (1970) – in which for the first time he broached adult themes like drug abuse – and Space 1999 (1975) were once again instant cult hits.

But at the time of Anderson’s greatest success his private life was in chaos. His volatile marriage to Sylvia (famously the voice behind Thunderbird’s Lady Penelope) was crumbling. In a last-ditch effort to save it he bought an expensive house without selling his first home first, and when the property market crashed he was left in financial crisis. The couple eventually divorced in 1975 and so acrimonious was it the pair were never to speak to one another again. “As far as I am concerned.” Anderson once said. “She no longer exists.”

Sylvia went on to carve out a successful solo career, working for the American cable TV company HBO. She also won custody of their only son, Gerry Jnr. A gruelling and costly three-year legal battle undertaken by Anderson to get access to the boy swallowed up most of his fortune but he did at least win some visiting rights with his child, but on the day of the first proposed visit he received a letter in Gerry’s handwriting stating his wish never to see his father again. Anderson was mortified, and was not to see him for another 20 years, until out of the blue his estranged son contacted him in 1998 for a long overdue reconciliation. 

After more than a decade in the entertainment wilderness 1994 saw Anderson’s long-awaited return to big time television production with Space Precinct, a cop show set in outer space. It was his costliest series ever, with a $36 million budget, but the American backers went bust and the show folded. Anderson followed this up with a none-too-successful animated serial, Lavender Castle (1998), aimed squarely at the children’s market.

Genuinely modest about his achievements and slightly embarrassed by the fan adulation his shows engendered, Anderson received an MBE in 2001 for services to animation. Domestically, too, he found contentment in later life. His third marriage, to Mary Robins, produced his fourth child, Jamie. Anderson, who earlier this year was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, claimed that not only did Mary save his life after the personal trauma following his divorce from Sylvia, but also taught him how to be a better parent.

Learning through the bitter experience of being so distant with his other children, Anderson forged a far deeper and stronger  relationship with Jamie – although he liked to joke that the only fly in the ointment was that Jamie had grown up more a Dr Who fanatic than a Thunderbirds fan.  

Gerry Anderson: television producer and director: born London 14 April 1929; married 1952 Betty Wrightman (marriage dissolved; two daughters), 1961 Sylvia Thamm (marriage dissolved; one son), 1981 Mary Robins (one son); died Oxfordshire 26 December 2012

Arts and Entertainment
Characters in the new series are based on real people, say its creators, unlike Arya and Clegane the Dog in ‘Game of Thrones’
tv'The Last Kingdom' embraces politics, religion, warfare, courage, love and loyalty, say creators
Sport
Sergio Romero saves Wesley Sneijder's penalty
world cup 2014But after defeating the Dutch, Lionel Messi and Argentina will walk out at the Maracana on Sunday as underdogs against Germany
Sport
Scoreboard at the end of the semi-final World Cup match between Brazil and Germany at The Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte
Sport
'Saddest man in Brazil' takes defeat with good grace, handing replica trophy to German fans
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
News
peopleThe Game of Thrones author said speculation about his health and death was 'offensive'
Arts and Entertainment
Martin Freeman and Lauren O'Neil in Jamie Lloyd's Richard III
theatreReview: The monarch's malign magnetism and diabolic effrontery aren’t felt
News
Glamour magazine hosts a yoga class with Yogalosophy author Mandy Ingber on June 10, 2013 in New York City.
newsFather Padraig O'Baoill said the exercise was 'unsavoury' in a weekly parish newsletter
Extras
indybest
News
people'She is unstoppable', says Jean Paul Gaultier at Paris show
Sport
Alexis Sanchez and apparently his barber Carlos Moles in Barcelona today
football
Arts and Entertainment
Miley Cyrus has her magic LSD brain stolen in this crazy video produced with The Flaming Lips
video
Arts and Entertainment
In his own words: Oscar Wilde in 1882
theatreNew play by the Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials - and what they reveal about the man
News
people
Arts and Entertainment
Unless films such as Guardians of the Galaxy, pictured, can buck the trend, this summer could be the first in 13 years that not a single Hollywood blockbuster takes $300m
filmWith US films earning record-breaking amounts at the Chinese box office, Hollywood is more than happy to take its lead from its new-found Asian audience
News
The garage was up for sale in Canning Place Mews for £500,000
newsGarage for sale for £500,000
Life and Style
tech
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Mobile App/IOS Developer (C#, ASP.NET, .NET, MVC)

£50000 - £60000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: Mobile App/IOS...

Front End Developer-JavaScript, Angular J.S, HTML, CSS, ASP.NET

£40000 - £45000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: Front End Deve...

Associate CXL Consultant

£40000 - £60000 per annum + BONUS + BENEFITS: Harrington Starr: CXL, Triple Po...

Associate CXL Consultant

£40000 - £60000 per annum + BONUS + BENEFITS: Harrington Starr: CXL, Triple Po...

Day In a Page

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

A future Palestine state will have no borders and be an enclave within Israel, surrounded on all sides by Israeli-held territory, says Robert Fisk
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

The German people demand an end to the fighting
New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

New play reveals what Oscar Wilde said at trials

For a century, what Wilde actually said at his trials was a mystery. But the recent discovery of shorthand notes changed that. Now his grandson Merlin Holland has turned them into a play
Can scientists save the world's sea life from

Can scientists save our sea life?

By the end of the century, the only living things left in our oceans could be plankton and jellyfish. Alex Renton meets the scientists who are trying to turn the tide
Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice
Hollywood targets Asian audiences as US films enjoy record-breaking run at Chinese box office

Hollywood targets Asian audiences

The world's second biggest movie market is fast becoming the Hollywood studios' most crucial
Grindr founder Joel Simkhai: 'I've found love on my dating app - and my mum keeps trying to hook me up!'

Grindr founder Joel Simkhai: 'I've found love on my dating app'

Five years on from its launch and Grindr is the world's most popular dating app for gay men. Its founder Joel Simkhai answers his critics, describes his isolation as a child
Autocorrect has its uses but it can go rogue with embarrassing results - so is it time to ditch it?

Is it time to ditch autocorrect?

Matthew J X Malady persuaded friends to message manually instead, but failed to factor in fat fingers and drunk texting
10 best girls' summer dresses

Frock chick: 10 best girls' summer dresses

Get them ready for the holidays with these cool and pretty options 
Westminster’s dark secret: Adultery, homosexuality, sadomasochism and abuse of children were all seemingly lumped together

Westminster’s dark secret

Adultery, homosexuality, sadomasochism and abuse of children were all seemingly lumped together
A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Dulce et decorum est - a life cut short for a poet whose work achieved immortality

A History of the First World War in 100 Moments

Dulce et decorum est: a life cut short for a poet whose work achieved immortality
Google tells popular music website to censor album cover art in 'sexually explicit content' ban

Naked censorship?

The strange case of Google, the music website and the nudity take-down requests
Howzat! 8 best cricket bats

Howzat! 8 best cricket bats

As England take on India at Trent Bridge, here is our pick of the high-performing bats to help you up your run-count this summer 
Brazil vs Germany World Cup 2014 comment: David Luiz falls from leader figure to symbol of national humiliation

David Luiz falls from leader figure to symbol of national humiliation

Captain appears to give up as shocking 7-1 World Cup semi-final defeat threatens ramifications in Brazil