Pervis Jackson: Detroit Spinners bass vocalist

The fine art of blending vocals in a group is one that was beautifully exemplified by the line-up of the Detroit Spinners. The group's foundation was the bass singing of Pervis Jackson, to which was added Henry Fambrough's baritone and the tenor voices of Bobbie Smith and Billy Henderson. These four were the group's mainstays, but additional fifth members who came and went included Philippe Wynne, whose distinctive falsetto and high tenor graced several hits between 1972 and 1977.

Known simply as the Spinners in the US, where there was little chance of their being mistaken for the Liverpudlian folk group of the same name, they spanned the doo-wop, rhythm'n'blues, soul, funk and disco eras and recorded both for Motown in Detroit in the 1960s and for Atlantic in the 1970s, working under the auspices of the producer Thom Bell at Sigma Sound Studios in Philadelphia. Jackson's distinctive deep tones came to the fore on "Working My Way Back To You", their 1980 UK chart-topper – he's the one booming "Been prayin' every day" – and on "They Just Can't Stop It (Games People Play)", one of the group's 10 US Top 20 hits.

Bell had been determined to showcase Jackson in 1975. "Basses are not usually designed to do anything but hold the root, in order to hold it all together. They're not really known for being soloists," recalled the producer. "So I said I'm going to come up with something for that guy. And from the moment I gave him that part, his whole personality changed. He's known for that one thing, but that one thing changed his life: 12.45," said Bell, refering to the lyric that became Jackson's nickname. Indeed, Jackson singing that signature line – "12.45" – on "They Just Can't Stop It" always brought the house down wherever the Spinners performed.

Born in New Orleans in 1938, Jackson moved to Ferndale, a small town just outside Detroit, when he was seven and met most of the future Spinners at Lincoln High School. Originally called the Domingoes, they renamed themselves after a brand of hubcaps and were mentored by Harvey Fuqua of the Moonglows, who sang on their first US hit, the doo-wop ballad "That's What Girls are Made For", and its soulful follow-up, "Love (I'm So Glad) I Found You" in 1961.

Fuqua was dating and subsequently married Gwen Gordy, sister of the Motown founder Berry Gordy, and brought his Tri-Phi label under the company's umbrella. Still, the Spinners languished in development hell, only releasing half a dozen singles on Motown and its V.I.P. subsidiary over the next six years. Jackson often worked in the office of the Detroit company, sending out records to stores and DJs. In 1970, the group finally scored another US hit with "It's A Shame", written and produced by Stevie Wonder, and made their chart début in the UK where they were briefly known as the Motown Spinners.

On the advice of their friend Aretha Franklin, they finally left Motown for Atlantic, though they were no higher up the pecking order there until Bell, who had made his name producing the lush, symphonic Philly soul of the Delfonics and the Stylistics, opted to work with them and co-wrote "I'll Be Around" in 1972.

Between "Could It Be I'm Falling In Love" in 1973 and the "Cupid/I've Loved You For A Long Time" medley in 1980, the Spinners were a constant fixture on the US and British charts and regulars on Top of the Pops and Soul Train, their matching suits and dance routines on "The Rubberband Man" (1976) and "Working My Way Back To You" as endearing as their vocal harmonies have proved enduring. The group's cover of the Four Seasons' "Working My Way Back To You" held a special meaning for Jackson who was married for 40 years but had long spells away from his wife and family. The Spinners also toured with Dionne Warwick and duetted with her on "Then Came You", a US number one in 1974.

A big man with a big heart, who took special care of his autistic son, Jackson never considered retirement. He appeared with the Spinners as recently as last month and was diagnosed with brain and liver cancer only a few days before his death. The group are due to appear at a Soul Weekender in Prestatyn, North Wales, in October, with the lead singer Carlton Washington and the high tenor Harold "Spike" Bonhart, as well as the founder members Smith and Fambrough.

Pierre Perrone

Pervis Jackson, singer: born New Orleans, Louisiana 17 May 1938; married (two daughters, three sons); died Detroit, Michigan 18 August 2008.

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