Anniversaries

Births: Ovid, Roman poet, 43 BC; Jean-Antoine Houdon, sculptor, 1741; Johann Friedrich Holderlin, poet, 1770; Thomas Webster, painter, 1800; William Barnes, poet, 1801; Luise Dulcken (David), pianist, 1811; Ned Buntline (Edward Zane Carroll Judson), novelist, 1823; Henrik Ibsen, playwright, 1828; Sir Florence Lancia, soprano, 1840; Beniamino Gigli, operatic tenor, 1890; Lauritz Melchior, operatic tenor, 1890; Max Brand (Frederick Schiller Faust), novelist and screenwriter, 1892; Hugh L. Maclennan, novelist, 1907; Sir Michael Scudamore Redgrave, actor, 1908; Wendell Corey, actor, 1914.

Deaths: Henry IV, King of England, 1413; Sir Thomas Elyot, diplomat, doctor and writer, 1546; Thomas, Lord Seymour of Sudeley, Lord High Admiral of England, executed, 1549; Sir Isaac Newton, scientist, 1727; Nicolas de Largillire, painter, 1746; Lajos Kossuth, Hungarian patriot, 1894; George Nathaniel Curzon, first Marquess Curzon of Kedleston, Viceroy of India, 1925; Ferdinand Foch, Marshal of France, 1929; Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham, author, 1936; Lt-Cdr Percy Thomson Dean, VC, 1939; Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas, editor and poet, 1945; Henry Handel Richardson (Ethel Florence Richardson), novelist, 1946; Charles Kay Ogden, linguist and originator of Basic English, 1957; Brendan Behan, writer, 1964.

On this day: Spain dispatched Pedro Menendez de Aviles to settle Florida and expel the French, 1565; the Dutch East India Company was founded, 1602; the New England Weekly Journal was first published, 1727; the foundation stone of Dartmoor Prison, Devon, was laid, 1806; Napoleon arrived at Fontainebleau and the ``Hundred Days'' began, 1815; the Burlington Arcade, London, was opened, 1819; Marble Arch, formerly at Buckingham Palace, was unveiled at its present site in London, 1851; Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe, was first published in book form, 1852; Bismarck resigned as Germany's first chancellor, 1890; the hospital ship Asturias was hit by a torpedo from a German U-boat, 1917; the first London production of the musical show Rose-Marie was presented, 1925; the Nazis opened their first concentration camp at Dachau, near Munich, 1933; the British Council was established, 1935; Hungary was occupied by the Germans, 1944; France recognised the independence of Tunisia, 1956; Isabel Peron, former president of Argentina, was jailed for eight years for corruption, 1981.

Today is the Feast Day of St Cuthbert, St Herbert, St Martin of Braga, St Photina and her Companions, St Wulfram and The Martyrs of Mar Saba.

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