Appeals: Kettle's Yard

An untitled painting, oil on lino, by Ben Nicholson. The painting is part of the permanent collection at Kettle's Yard, the only contemporary public art gallery in Cambridge. The gallery is about to undergo refurbishment and is appealing to raise a further pounds 150,000 for the project; it has already raised pounds 355,000.

Kettle's Yard was the inspiration of HS (Jim) Ede (1895-1990), a collector and critic of 20th-century art, who was keen to encourage others to appreciate contemporary art. During the 1920s and 1930s Ede had been a curator at the Tate Gallery. In 1957, every afternoon, he opened his then house, which had been four slum dwellings at Kettle's Yard, to students and young people so that they could visit and discuss, enjoy and learn about, art. He described it as 'a living place where works of art could be enjoyed'. Pieces from his collection - by Ben and Winifred Nicholson, Henry Moore, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, Alfred Wallis, Christopher Wood, Constantin Brancusi, Joan Miro and Barbara Hepworth - were often lent to students for their rooms. No record was kept of this borrowing - all the pieces returned - and the gallery would now like to hear from any of the borrowers.

Ede gave Kettle's Yard and its contents, which included the collection and his furniture, to Cambridge University in 1966, with an endowment for its upkeep. (Nevertheless, the gallery must raise pounds 100,000- pounds 150,000 each year from public donations.) In 1970 a separate gallery was built, designed by Sir Leslie Martin, who collaborated with Ben Nicholson on the art magazine Circle; this allowed for a changing exhibition to be run alongside Ede's permanent collection. The gallery's present exhibition, 'Sense and Sensuality', finishes on Sunday 25 April. The gallery - but not the house, which houses the permanent collection - will be closed from next month until January 1994: the room space will be extended so that two exhibitions can run concurrently. The appeal money will also go towards providing an accessible archive and catalogue of the collection, a cafe and shop and more educational facilities for the 36,000 annual visitors to the gallery.

For further information, contact: Kettle's Yard, Castle Street, Cambridge CB3 0AQ, telephone 0223 352124.

(Photograph omitted)

PROMOTED VIDEO
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

HR Manager - Kent - £45,000

£40000 - £45000 per annum: Ashdown Group: HR Manager / Training Manager (L&D /...

HR Manager - Edgware, London - £45,000

£40000 - £45000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: HR Manager - Edgware, Lon...

HR Manager - London - £40,000 + bonus

£32000 - £40000 per annum + bonus: Ashdown Group: HR Manager (Generalist) -Old...

Talent Manager / HR Manager - central London - £50,000

£45000 - £50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Talent / Learning & Development Mana...

Day In a Page

Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits
Mystery of the Ground Zero wedding photo

A shot in the dark

Mystery of the wedding photo from Ground Zero
His life, the universe and everything

His life, the universe and everything

New biography sheds light on comic genius of Douglas Adams
Save us from small screen superheroes

Save us from small screen superheroes

Shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D are little more than marketing tools
Reach for the skies

Reach for the skies

From pools to football pitches, rooftop living is looking up
These are the 12 best hotel spas in the UK

12 best hotel spas in the UK

Some hotels go all out on facilities; others stand out for the sheer quality of treatments
These Iranian-controlled Shia militias used to specialise in killing American soldiers. Now they are fighting Isis, backed up by US airstrikes

Widespread fear of Isis is producing strange bedfellows

Iranian-controlled Shia militias that used to kill American soldiers are now fighting Isis, helped by US airstrikes
Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Shoppers don't come to Topshop for the unique
How to make a Lego masterpiece

How to make a Lego masterpiece

Toy breaks out of the nursery and heads for the gallery
Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Urbanites are cursed with an acronym pointing to Employed but No Disposable Income or Savings
Paisley’s decision to make peace with IRA enemies might remind the Arabs of Sadat

Ian Paisley’s decision to make peace with his IRA enemies

His Save Ulster from Sodomy campaign would surely have been supported by many a Sunni imam