Diary: Dizzee with delight

Party of the year, we're assured, was the Serpentine Gallery's summer bash last week – to which Diary duly dispatched a reporter, hoping to garner some celebrity wisdom for your reading pleasure.

Lured by Grace Jones's preposterously unwieldy headgear, said reporter loitered alongside the singer and her silent entourage, whose attentions were focused on the ersatz 1980s disco taking place nearby. In response to said reporter's query (what did Ms Jones think of architect Jean Nouvel's vivid red pavilion installation and its contents?), Ms Jones put a hand to her throat and declared that she was "saving [her] voice". Saving it for a singing performance, or just for talking to someone more important?

The "secret" artist providing the evening's musical entertainment turned out to be not Jones, but Dizzee Rascal, who seemed a little shocked when the stage was invaded by posh girls crying: "It's so great he's gone disco!" and other such exclamations. So there's our answer.

* More coalition tensions in the shires. An email arrives from Cllr Paul Hodgkinson, Liberal Democrat opposition leader on the Cotswold District Council – which comprises only Lib Dem and Conservative members. Hodgkinson tells us he presented a motion to the council supporting the coalition agenda, and suggesting they urge the local Tory MP to vote for certain Bills in the Commons. He'd predicted his motion "would unite the council for once... nothing could've been further from the truth." It was voted down by a substantial margin. Could this be because his favoured coalition policies are from the Lib Dem playbook (electoral reform chief among them)? Hodgkinson eagerly directs us to the Gloucestershire Echo, which reports that the Tories did indeed accuse him of "cherry-picking". "It's not a question of cherry-picking," he responded indignantly. "You need to get on the same viewpoint. The local press are here and the national press are also bound to pick up on it, too, so you'll regret it." Correct in one respect: the national press has picked up on it (see?). But is it his rivals who'll regret the episode, or Hodgkinson himself?

* You might say Lord Ashcroft was more trouble than he's worth to the Conservative Party, if he wasn't worth millions in campaign donations. But the Tory peer – who nobly resigned his non-dom status to retain his seat in the Lords – remains a source of discomfort for Cameroons, due to his criticisms of how his campaign cash was spent. The former Tory treasurer is said to be writing a book about the party leadership's electoral mis-steps. And yesterday Conservative Home, the website of which he is majority owner, announced he'd be speaking at one of its fringe events at this year's Tory conference, on the topic of "the Tory election performance". Should be interesting – especially for troublemaking hacks.



* Diary has a fast-growing reputation for factual vagueness, which can only have been enhanced by the news that GMTV is to be rebranded Daybreak upon the arrival of its new presenters, Adrian Chiles and Christine Bleakley, later this summer. On 2 July we informed readers that the name Daybreak had been discarded by producers, because it is shared with the fictional and flagrantly awful breakfast news show that's the setting for Morning Glory – a Hollywood film (starring Harrison Ford) set to hit our cinemas at around the same time as Chiles and Bleakley's reunion. Evidently, ITV has called our bluff.



* Chiles, the channel must hope, will have a greater impact at breakfast time than he did during the World Cup. Given the choice between his ITV1 coverage of the final, and that of his former MOTD superior Gary Lineker on BBC1, audiences favoured the Beeb by a whopping 4.5-to-1 average, with the BBC hitting a peak viewership of 17.9 million to ITV's 3.8 million. Peter Fincham, ITV's director of television said Chiles had offered "a fresh perspective". Perhaps he's referring to the perspective from ITV's studio in Johannesburg, where the final was held. Lineker and co were 750 miles away in Cape Town.

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Recruitment Genius: Management Trainer

£30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Exciting career opportunity to join East...

Recruitment Genius: Senior Scientist / Research Assistant

£18000 - £28000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An ambitious start-up company b...

Reach Volunteering: Chair of Trustees

VOLUNTARY ONLY - EXPENSES REIMBURSED: Reach Volunteering: Do you love the Engl...

Day In a Page

Homeless Veterans Christmas Appeal: ‘We give them hope. They come to us when no one else can help’

Christmas Appeal

Meet the charity giving homeless veterans hope – and who they turn to when no one else can help
Should doctors and patients learn to plan humane, happier endings rather than trying to prolong life?

Is it always right to try to prolong life?

Most of us would prefer to die in our own beds, with our families beside us. But, as a GP, Margaret McCartney sees too many end their days in a medicalised battle
Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night - is that what it takes for women to get to the top?

What does it take for women to get to the top?

Thomas Cook's outgoing boss Harriet Green got by on four hours sleep a night and told women they had to do more if they wanted to get on
Christmas jumper craze: Inside the UK factory behind this year's multicultural must-have

Knitting pretty: British Christmas Jumpers

Simmy Richman visits Jack Masters, the company behind this year's multicultural must-have
French chefs have launched a campaign to end violence in kitchens - should British restaurants follow suit?

French chefs campaign against bullying

A group of top chefs signed a manifesto against violence in kitchens following the sacking of a chef at a Paris restaurant for scalding his kitchen assistant with a white-hot spoon
Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour War and Peace on New Year's Day as Controller warns of cuts

Just what you need on a New Year hangover...

Radio 4 to broadcast 10-hour adaptation of War and Peace on first day of 2015
Cuba set to stage its first US musical in 50 years

Cuba to stage first US musical in 50 years

Claire Allfree finds out if the new production of Rent will hit the right note in Havana
Christmas 2014: 10 best educational toys

Learn and play: 10 best educational toys

Of course you want them to have fun, but even better if they can learn at the same time
Paul Scholes column: I like Brendan Rodgers as a manager but Liverpool seem to be going backwards not forwards this season

Paul Scholes column

I like Brendan Rodgers as a manager but Liverpool seem to be going backwards not forwards this season
Lewis Moody column: Stuart Lancaster has made all the right calls – now England must deliver

Lewis Moody: Lancaster has made all the right calls – now England must deliver

So what must the red-rose do differently? They have to take the points on offer 
Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

Cameron, Miliband and Clegg join forces for Homeless Veterans campaign

It's in all our interests to look after servicemen and women who fall on hard times, say party leaders
Millionaire Sol Campbell wades into wealthy backlash against Labour's mansion tax

Sol Campbell cries foul at Labour's mansion tax

The former England defender joins Myleene Klass, Griff Rhys Jones and Melvyn Bragg in criticising proposals
Nicolas Sarkozy returns: The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?

Sarkozy returns

The ex-President is preparing to fight for the leadership of France's main opposition party – but will he win big enough?
Is the criticism of Ed Miliband a coded form of anti-Semitism?

Is the criticism of Miliband anti-Semitic?

Attacks on the Labour leader have coalesced around a sense that he is different, weird, a man apart. But is the criticism more sinister?
Ouija boards are the must-have gift this Christmas, fuelled by a schlock horror film

Ouija boards are the must-have festive gift

Simon Usborne explores the appeal - and mysteries - of a century-old parlour game