Hit & Run: Curse of the pretty boys

It's a serious quandary for every married man – who also happens to be ridiculously good-looking. You've been happily hitched for years, but members of the opposite sex either didn't get that memo, or, most problematically, choose to ignore it. Women literally throw themselves at you. What's a guy to do?

This week, David Beckham was left fiddling with his wedding ring in the face of a full-on flirt attack as a millefoglie of shapely Italian women inundated him at a charity dinner in Milan; Mrs Beckham, you see, had returned to Los Angeles, leaving her beau to the perfumed she-wolves.

The biggest test for the England man came after an auction, in which a busty Italian socialite called Gabriella Dompe successfully bid for one of Beckham's T-shirts. In one picture she is seen walking over to the player and appears to sit on his knee, almost going in for a kiss as she drapes her bejewelled right arm (pictured) round his shoulders (perhaps she imagined her prize would be the shirt on his back). If Beckham was left squirming – and he looks pretty awkward – the midfielder would do well to look at how other handsome-but-hitched men have dealt with this trickiest of situations.

First up: Tom Jones. The hip-swinging singer, who has been married to his wife, Linda, for more than 50 years, was such a heart-throb in his heyday that he once told the New York Daily News he "carries a .38 pistol wherever I can" to guard against crazed female fans.

A simpler approach might be to simply let it be known that your relationship is rock-solid and your partner's trust in you absolute. Johnny Depp's girlfriend of a decade, Vanessa Paradis, has frequently stated that the best protection from marauding admirers is trust – or at least a semblance of it. When asked about women's desire to mob her man, Paradis said "I understand. I want to mob him all the time. He's a very charming person."

There are those men who cannot be trusted. Despite his long marriage, Jones is no paragon – the Welsh sex bomb's extra-marital conquests include a lap dancer, a model and a former Miss World. On American television, Jones revealed his wife beat him "black and blue" after learning about one of the affairs.

If one man stands as the model of dignified behaviour, it's the late Paul Newman. His approach was to remove himself from the worst of the temptation – living far from Hollywood in Connecticut. When asked about female admirers, he quipped,"Why go out for hamburger when you have steak at home?"

Well, Beckham could at least start by steering clear of charity auctions – lest his wife should turn him into minced meat.

Update your Facebook status – not your CV

With unemployment figures creeping past the two million mark, jobseekers websites must – unlike most everyone else – be doing a roaring trade.

But are they really the best way to find work in this wired world? Most of us are entering a recession with the internet at our disposal for the first time.

Facebook has long been used to connect flats with flatmates, so why not jobs to jobseekers? The social network has advantages over more impersonal recruitment sites. Many posts are filled before an ad ever reaches the jobs pages; but your online social network is full of friends with inside knowledge. They know you personally, can match you to a job that suits, and become advocates on your behalf.

Farhad Manjoo, a technology writer for 'Slate' magazine, found a few readers who'd successfully used Facebook to get work. He discovered that those who managed the feat were from plugged-in professions: the media or, inevitably, IT itself.

One friend of mine hijacked a Facebook meme to jazz up her covering letter. Instead of Dear Sir/Madam, she wrote her own career-focussed "25 things about me"; presumably "1. name, 2. date of birth, 3. contact details, 4. words per minute..." etc. She got the job.

TIM WALKER

(Bottle) blonde ambition

Most of us – 62 per cent – take blonde colleagues less seriously than brunettes (according to a survey by Superdrug). I suspected as much when I moved to London, growing out of my golden dye to reveal the professional brunette within.

I imagined brown hair would make me behave with more dignity, less "bubbly". But it felt fake. Perhaps, if you've been dyeing your hair blonde for most of your life, it gets under your skin. So I'm keeping it real now, and am back on the bottle. It hasn't done Hillary Clinton any harm.

SOPHIE MORRIS

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

HR Manager - London - £40,000 + bonus

£32000 - £40000 per annum + bonus: Ashdown Group: HR Manager (Generalist) -Old...

Talent Manager / HR Manager - central London - £50,000

£45000 - £50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Talent / Learning & Development Mana...

HR Manager (standalone) - London

Up to £40,000: Ashdown Group: Standalone HR Manager role for an SME business b...

HR Analyst - Banking - Bristol - £350-£400

£350 - £400 per day: Orgtel: HR Analyst - Banking - Bristol - £350 - £400 per ...

Day In a Page

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering