Katie Hopkins so terrified for own safety she has a panic button in her family home

The TV motormouth's Exeter home is 'rigged up to the local police station'

She’s the most hated woman in Britain so it may come as little surprise that Katie Hopkins is terrified about reprisals for her outspoken views.

The ever-controversial TV personality and columnist has revealed that she is so wary of her family’s safety that a panic button is installed in her Exeter home, just in case..

“Our house is rigged up to the local police station – that’s just my life I suppose,” she told the Daily Star, adding that her children are “somewhat isolated” from the dangers she may face as “they don’t have iPads and they don’t have phones”.

“My parents aren’t a part of it at all either,” she said. “They don’t go on Twitter. I just send them clips of me looking fairly alright.”

 

Hopkins’ outspoken opinions have been the cause of much public outrage since she first appeared on The Apprentice eight years ago. Since then, she has taken part in I’m A Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here!, Celebrity Big Brother and Question Time.

The 40-year-old lives with her husband Mark and their three children Max, India and Poppy, all aged ten and under.

She has received many death threats since 2007 for deliberately causing offence with provocative comments about divisive issues including obesity, benefit and immigration.

Hopkins recently branded dementia patients “bed blockers” before suggesting they should be “banged over the head” as she would want to be as there is “no point of life” with the illness.

Last May, she told an audience of Cambridge University students that she didn’t “really like fat people” and “wouldn’t like to meet a ginger in the dark”.

Her lucky dip of obnoxious quotes has also produced classics such as “suicidal prisoners should just kill themselves”, that women shouldn’t breastfeed in public and the unkind remark that Nigella Lawson is a “self-obsessed flirt”.

“Some people might think I’m a disgusting harlot of a woman who doesn’t deserve the right to speak,” she said. “That view is particularly strong at the moment. But I welcome that because we’re all so different.”

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