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Feminism: It's not a dirty word


No interview question floors a female pop star quite like: "Are you a feminist?" Taylor Swift is the latest to refuse to confirm that she supports the cause, presumably terrified about being branded with the "F" word.

When website The Daily Beast asked her, she said: "I don't really think about things as guys versus girls. I was... brought up to think if you work as hard as guys, you can go far in life."

She's far from the only female pop star to avoid confirming they are a feminist, even if they will happily talk about female empowerment and equality.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if a few more influential women were happy to teach their young fans that being a feminist has nothing to do with man-hating or bra-burning and isn't as scary or aggressive as they think?

Lady Gaga: "I'm not a feminist. I hail men, I love men. I celebrate American male culture: Beer, bars and muscle cars."

Beyoncé Knowles: "I feel like... you know... it's, like, what I live for. I need to find a catchy new word for feminism, right? Like 'Bootylicious'."

Geri Halliwell: "It's about labelling. For me feminism is bra-burning lesbianism. It's very unglamorous. I'd like to see it rebranded. We need to see a celebration of our femininity and softness."

Gwen Stefani: "Well, I'd have to get a definition of it first. I mean, I'm pro-woman… I guess I don't want to say I am a feminist because nobody will ever define it for me."

And Katy Perry who's not afraid of the f-word: "I believe in integrity, respect and independence. I can be a feminist without being a man hater."