Welcome to the new Independent website. We hope you enjoy it and we value your feedback. Please contact us here.

Karren Brady 'to be given Tory peerage' in David Cameron's latest wave of appointments

Brady will reportedly be appointed along with a number of other high profile businesspeople and party supporters including ex M&S boss Sir Stuart Rose

Entrepreneur and Conservative Party supporter Karren Brady is reportedly being eyed for prestigious membership in the House of Lords following rumours on David Cameron’s latest raft of peerage appointments.

Brady, who is West Ham’s Vice-Chairman and star of the BBC’s The Apprentice, is expected to be announced a Tory peer alongside former Marks & Spencer chief Sir Stuart Rose.

According to Sky News, the 20-strong list also includes multimillionaire Tory donor and City financier Michael Farmer, who has gifted the party at least £3.5million in the last seven years.

Some pundits have said that the move could open up an avenue for Brady to run for London Mayorship when Boris Johnson's second term ends, despite her unequivocal insistence in December 2013 that she’s not considering it.

“I’m not going to become an MP and I’m not going to be London Mayor. I have no political ambitions,” she told the Daily Telegraph last year.


Downing Street has refused to comment on the latest claims “in advance” of their announcement.

“Honours and appointments are made in the usual way through the independent honours committees,” a spokesman said.

The timing of the publication of peerages is unknown, though it can be as early as next week.

The Barons and Baronesses will be chosen by Cameron and Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg.

Though the reports haven’t been verified, Lord Alan Sugar, who was appointed to the upper house in 2009 by Labour, congratulated Brady yesterday and said he was looking forward to “debating with her across the benches.”

Nicknamed the First Lady of Football, Brady, 45, is also Prime Minister David Cameron’s Small Business Ambassador.

The announcement could stoke tensions surrounding unelected peers and further inflate calls for a reform of the House of Lords.