Katie Hopkins attacks ‘in vogue’ selfie campaign for kidnapped Nigeria schoolgirls

Hopkins said real action was required to save the girls - not social media

Katie Hopkins has insisted that “peacocking on social media” will not help save the kidnapped Nigerian school girls.

The relentless motor mouth wrote about the harrowing issue in her latest Sun column, hitting out at celebrities who have been uploading photos of themselves with posters reading #BringBackOurGirls.

“Listen fools,” she said. “You can hold up a sign with a hashtag until your arms drop off, but these girls are not coming back alive unless someone goes in and gets them.”

High-profile figures to take part in the selfie campaign so far have included US First Lady Michelle Obama, prime minister David Cameron and supermodel Cara Delevingne.

Prime Minister David Cameron joins the campaign to to save the kidnapped schoolgirls

But Hopkins has argued that “Obamageddon” would have kicked in to rescue the girls, had they been from America.

“If 276 high school girls had been kidnapped from the US, Obamageddon would have been unleashed,” she wrote. “Instead, Mrs Obama has tried asking nicely, made big puppy dog eyes at the camera.

“David Cameron wasn’t going to be outdone by Mrs Obama and got himself a sign with the same hashtag. Dave knows it is important to be seen to be doing something and, apparently, holding a sign is very much in vogue.”

Hopkins’ article has been met with positive responses online – a stark contrast to the usual reception reserved for her often-controversial and always outspoken opinions.

The former Apprentice star emphasised the need for “giants of men with daggers on their berets and courage in their hearts to teach Mad Dog Boko Bill a lesson”.

Local residents have started taking matters into their own hands and forming vigilante groups, after feeling that the Nigerian military was not doing enough to stem attacks by the Boko Haram Islamic militants.

Hopkins, meanwhile, spoke at the Cambridge Union earlier this week, where she told students she didn't "really like fat people" and "wouldn't like to be ginger in the dark".