Private funeral held for Amy Winehouse

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

The grief-stricken father of singer Amy Winehouse told her to "sleep tight" today as her family and friends said their last goodbyes.

In a heartfelt eulogy, Mitch Winehouse told mourners his daughter had "conquered" her drug addiction, was "trying hard to deal with her drinking", and was happier than she had been for a long time.



The Grammy-award winning singer, who had battled drink and drug problems throughout her career, was found dead at her home in Camden on Saturday.



The funeral service at Edgwarebury Cemetery in north London ended to the strains of her favourite song, Carole King's So Far Away.



Mr Winehouse said his daughter had recently told him: "Dad I've had enough, I can't stand the look on your and the family's faces anymore."



He also revealed plans to set up a foundation in his daughter's name to help people struggling with addiction.



He added: "Knowing she wasn't depressed, knowing she passed away, knowing she passed away happy, it makes us all feel better."



His eulogy ended with the words: "Goodnight, my angel, sleep tight. Mummy and Daddy love you ever so much."



Among the guests at the service, which included prayers in English and Hebrew, were stylist Alex Foden, who has been credited with creating Winehouse's trademark beehive hairdo, producer Mark Ronson and singer Kelly Osbourne.



Winehouse's band-mates, Zalon and Heshima Thompson, were among the select group included in the private ceremony which, according to Jewish law, had to take place as soon as possible after the star's death.



A spokesman for the family said: "Mitch was funny, he told some great stories from childhood about how headstrong she was, and clearly the family and friends recognised the stories and laughed along.



"He stressed so many times she was happier now than she had ever been and he spoke about her boyfriend and paid tribute to a lot of people in her life."



After the service, which was led by Rabbi Frank Hellner, Winehouse's body was taken to Golders Green Crematorium.



The family will hold a two-day Shiva - a traditional period of mourning in the Jewish faith - after the service.



Alfie Ezekiel, a friend of Amy's father, said: "Mitch gave a very good eulogy and he managed to get through it very well, considering.



"He said everything. I don't want to go into detail but his last words were 'Goodnight, my sweetheart'."



He said the service - during which Mr Winehouse was the only family member to speak - was "joyful" and "celebrated" the 27-year-old singer's life.



"It was very moving," he added.



The 55-year-old, from Loughton, Essex, said between 300 and 400 mourners attended the service.



Some guests appeared to be fighting back tears as they walked away hand in hand, or with their heads bowed.



One mourner, who did not want to give her name, said the ceremony had been "wonderful" but was unable to say more.



Describing Mr Winehouse's eulogy, another added: "It was emotional. He said that she would be carried in his heart.



"They were in contact three times a day, always, wherever she was.



"It's a complex situation but he is supported by his community. It's this extraordinary diaspora of people from north London who all knew Amy from when she was born."



And he said music would help the family through the "difficult times".



Winehouse's closest relatives and friends, including her mother Janis, brother Alex and her boyfriend Reg Traviss, then travelled to the crematorium where her grandmother was cremated.



The funeral comes after police revealed they will have to wait up to four weeks for the results of toxicology tests to establish her cause of death.



A post-mortem examination has proved inconclusive and an inquest has been opened and adjourned with no cause of death given.



Because of Winehouse's battles with drink and drugs, news of her death was quickly followed by suggestions it could be related to one or the other.



The troubled artist had cancelled all tour dates and engagements last month after a series of erratic public appearances that saw her booed during a shambolic performance in Serbia.





PA

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Ashdown Group: HR Manager Shared Services - Uxbridge, - 1 Year contract

£50000 per annum: Ashdown Group: HR Manager Shared Services - Uxbridge, Stock...

Recruitment Genius: Graduate Human Resource Officer and Executive Assistant

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity to join one of...

Ashdown Group: HR Assistant (Events business) - Central Manchester - £20K

£18000 - £20000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: HR Assistant (Events busi...

Recruitment Genius: Project Engineer

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: This privately-owned company designs and manuf...

Day In a Page

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence