Russell Brand’s autobiography Booky Wook 2 banned from Guantanamo Bay

'Booky Wook 2' was among literature deemed inappropriate for inmates

Russell Brand’s autobiography has been banned from Guantanamo Bay, a detained suspect has revealed.

The prisoner was reading Booky Wook 2, the second part of the British comedian’s memoirs. But it has since been classed among literature deemed inappropriate for inmates.

The suspect caught with the offending book is Shaker Aamer, a 44-year-old Saudi national who has been detained in the camp for 12 years without charge. He was originally captured in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2001.

He has indefinite leave to remain in the UK due to his British wife and children, who live in London. This makes him the last remaining British suspect at the US base.

“Clive Stafford-Smith gave me a list of the titles he had dropped off for me, so I could let him know later what had been banned," he said.

“One was Booky Wook 2 by Russell Brand. I understand that Brand uses too many rude words.

“I suppose you have to be amused by that: the US military is solicitous of my sensitive nature, and wants to protect me from swearing.”

However, he is allowed to read novels like George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago, the New Statesman reports.

Russell Brand is yet to comment on the report himself.

Earlier this year, Brand joined protesters in the 'Million Mask March' in London, who were demonstrating against cuts, corporations and increased state surveillance.

Hacktivist group Anonymous claimed the march on Whitehall and Trafalgar Square aimed to “spark the movement back into action against the persecution of internet freedom”.

Brand tweeted at the time: “Whatever party they claim to represent in the day, at night they show their true colours and all go to the same party #MillionMaskMarch.”

In an editorial for the Guardian written hours before the march, he defended his comments about not voting after Robert Webb and others criticised the comedian for promoting political apathy.

He said: “The only reason to vote is if the vote represents power or change. I don't think it does. I fervently believe that we deserve more from our democratic system than the few derisory tit-bits tossed from the carousel of the mighty, when they hop a few inches left or right.”

He added that the distinction between the political parties is “insignificant”.

“The reason these coalitions are so easily achieved is that the distinctions between the parties are insignificant,” he said.

“My friend went to a posh ‘do’ in the country where David Cameron, a man whose face resembles a little painted egg, was in attendance. Also present were members of the opposition and former prime minister Tony Blair. Whatever party they claim to represent in the day, at night they show their true colours and all go to the same party.”

Read more on that story here.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Ashdown Group: HR Manager - West London - £50,000

£40000 - £50000 per annum + bonus: Ashdown Group: HR Manager - West London - £...

Recruitment Genius: Recruitment & HR Administrator

£17000 - £18000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Guru Careers: HR Manager / HR Business Partner

£55 - 65k (DOE) + Benefits: Guru Careers: A HR Manager / HR Business Partner i...

Recruitment Genius: Senior HR Assistant

£23000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: The Company's vision is to be t...

Day In a Page

Seifeddine Rezgui: What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?

Making of a killer

What motivated a shy student to kill 38 holidaymakers in Tunisia?
Ajmer: The ancient Indian metropolis chosen to be a 'smart city' where residents would just be happy to have power and running water

Residents just want water and power in a city chosen to be a ‘smart’ metropolis

The Indian Government has launched an ambitious plan to transform 100 of its crumbling cities
How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

Holographic projections would provide extra information on objects in a person's visual field in real time
Sugary drinks 'are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year'

Sugary drinks are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year

The drinks that should be eliminated from people's diets
Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map
Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?