Russell Brand’s autobiography Booky Wook 2 banned from Guantanamo Bay

'Booky Wook 2' was among literature deemed inappropriate for inmates

Russell Brand’s autobiography has been banned from Guantanamo Bay, a detained suspect has revealed.

The prisoner was reading Booky Wook 2, the second part of the British comedian’s memoirs. But it has since been classed among literature deemed inappropriate for inmates.

The suspect caught with the offending book is Shaker Aamer, a 44-year-old Saudi national who has been detained in the camp for 12 years without charge. He was originally captured in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2001.

He has indefinite leave to remain in the UK due to his British wife and children, who live in London. This makes him the last remaining British suspect at the US base.

“Clive Stafford-Smith gave me a list of the titles he had dropped off for me, so I could let him know later what had been banned," he said.

“One was Booky Wook 2 by Russell Brand. I understand that Brand uses too many rude words.

“I suppose you have to be amused by that: the US military is solicitous of my sensitive nature, and wants to protect me from swearing.”

However, he is allowed to read novels like George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago, the New Statesman reports.

Russell Brand is yet to comment on the report himself.

Earlier this year, Brand joined protesters in the 'Million Mask March' in London, who were demonstrating against cuts, corporations and increased state surveillance.

Hacktivist group Anonymous claimed the march on Whitehall and Trafalgar Square aimed to “spark the movement back into action against the persecution of internet freedom”.

Brand tweeted at the time: “Whatever party they claim to represent in the day, at night they show their true colours and all go to the same party #MillionMaskMarch.”

In an editorial for the Guardian written hours before the march, he defended his comments about not voting after Robert Webb and others criticised the comedian for promoting political apathy.

He said: “The only reason to vote is if the vote represents power or change. I don't think it does. I fervently believe that we deserve more from our democratic system than the few derisory tit-bits tossed from the carousel of the mighty, when they hop a few inches left or right.”

He added that the distinction between the political parties is “insignificant”.

“The reason these coalitions are so easily achieved is that the distinctions between the parties are insignificant,” he said.

“My friend went to a posh ‘do’ in the country where David Cameron, a man whose face resembles a little painted egg, was in attendance. Also present were members of the opposition and former prime minister Tony Blair. Whatever party they claim to represent in the day, at night they show their true colours and all go to the same party.”

Read more on that story here.

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